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  • #16
    Cheap and easy test to check for bad valves

    To check for burnt valves, turn you ignition off and turn the engine over with the starter. If it speeds up on compression stroke, you probably need a valve job. this is just a quick check, you still need to check with a gauge to be sure.

    Years ago a Guy came in with a 56 chev V8 it had less than 50,000 miles. He was a mechanic at the county garage. He said he wanted a valve job. Next day I check it because chev V8's do not need a valve job with those low miles. I checked it with out the ignition on. It checked fine. It was a bad plug wire. When he came back to get it with his wife, she gave him a hard time because he was wrong. I think he would have been happier if I would have done a valve job.

    Comment


    • tbirdtbird
      tbirdtbird commented
      Editing a comment
      anybody can be wrong once in a while

    • Mitch
      Mitch commented
      Editing a comment
      You can hear the skip from low or no compression in a single cylinder due to many reasons, valves, Head gasket etc

    • sphanna
      sphanna commented
      Editing a comment
      If you hold a dollar bill (for example) over the exhaust pipe exit when engine is idling and the bill slaps the pipe on the intake strokes, I think this also indicates a leaking exhaust valve. Whadda U think? Am I thinking right here?

    • Ed H
      Ed H commented
      Editing a comment
      Leakage test, fast and accurate. Takes but a few minutes.
      Of course you can do a compression test, but that does not tell you which valve is bad.

  • #17
    Cylinder Head Torque Info

    C51B318B-D4CC-4338-8D75-AD093097A4F9L0001.jpg
    2 1930 Tudors

    Henry Ford said
    "It's all nuts and bolts"


    Mitch's Auto Service ctr

    Comment


    • #18
      Getting out head studs:

      I have been helping a couple of friends build a hill climb engine. It had 8 studs that would not come out. Bill DeVore and Steven Grace are the two guys. They came up with a neat idea how to get them out. They took some 1/2 inch plastic conduit cut it about 3/4 long and glued it to the block around the stud. Then filled it with penetrating oil. Then let it set for a few days. It worked.

      Comment


      • tbirdtbird
        tbirdtbird commented
        Editing a comment
        hmmmm
        George you are making me think of how I unseize pistons that are stuck at TDC... an engine builder supremo friend of mine taught me years ago to make a dam from modeling clay around the top of the bore (not PlayDoh), to contain the MMO which you then let sit there for as long as it took, replenishing as needed.

        Now it occurs to me you could do the same thing around frozen studs too!!

      • Mitch
        Mitch commented
        Editing a comment
        That is a nice tip and another good option to add to the arsenal

      • Tom Wesenberg
        Tom Wesenberg commented
        Editing a comment
        A few years ago I first heard about heating the stud, then melt wax against it so the wax will be sucked into the threads as the stud cools.
        I haven't tried it yet, but have heard from others that say it works for them.

      • BNCHIEF
        BNCHIEF commented
        Editing a comment
        In the past I have put parts that were rusted solid in a tray of diesel fuel and left them for a week it would free them up. That tube idea is a good one.

      • Mitch
        Mitch commented
        Editing a comment
        George what did you use for glue?

      • George Miller
        George Miller commented
        Editing a comment
        On that same engine some one in the past had broken 3 studs off flush with the top of the block. So we put it in the mill and put the head on with a few studs. Then we took a drill that just fit in the head. Drill a starting angle in the broken stud. Then took the head off and used a drill 2 sizes under the tap size. Then took the right size for a 7/14 tap and drilled it through the old stud, being sure to stop before drill through the block. Then took a tap, supported it with a center in the chuck on the mill. Went real careful so as not to break the tap. If you break the tap then you have a real problem. We got them out and the holes are great.

        I have heard about welding a nut to the stud, but I'm a farm welder, did not want to try it on this engine.

      • BNCHIEF
        BNCHIEF commented
        Editing a comment
        Tig welding works and it is how my engine builder gets a broken one out the guys at Berts remove a lot of them I will have to ask his builder what he does.

      • George Miller
        George Miller commented
        Editing a comment
        Getting out broken head studs:

        A couple of ways to get broken head studs out. One way is to get two sleeves made that will go in the bolt holes in the head. Put a shoulder on the top so you can get them back out. They should slide in the head hole but not be loose. Make one a two drill sizes smaller than the tap drill size. Then put the head on the block, mark the drill for the right depth so you do not drill through bottom of the hole. drill it out, now put the sleeve in for the drill size of the tap drill now do the same as the first drill. Now the hard part. Take the head off. Now you can take a block of steel drill a 90 degree hole the size of the tap make sure it is 90 degrees all the way around. Now tap the hole, go real slow, back it out often.

        Go slow and easy with the tap, if you break a tap in the hole you will have real trouble.

    • #19
      AER’s Rear Main Oil Leak Diagnosis:

      http://antiqueenginerebuilding.com/REARMAINLEAK.html
      2 1930 Tudors

      Henry Ford said
      "It's all nuts and bolts"


      Mitch's Auto Service ctr

      Comment


      • #20
        Bolt hole next to the camshaft on the rear of the engine. Poss source of oil leak


        To day while tearing a engine apart that got flood water in it some time ago. I remembered the cause of some rear main leaks that gets over looked. On some engines one of the bolt holes next to the cam shaft on the rear of the engine goes all the way into the inside of the engine. This engine is one of them, in this case it leaked so much oil it helped save the out side of the engine.
        Check any engine that you have apart. If the hole goes inside, seal the bolt with RTV.

        Comment


        • Dennis
          Dennis commented
          Editing a comment
          George you confirmed what might be where I have a leak inside my flywheel housing. The only bolts I didn't seal back there.

      • #21
        Tip on grinding A valves

        When grinding valves and using the old parts. I made a wood box that has 8 compartments and 8 holes drilled in back of the compartments. to hold the valves, and parts for each cylinder. They are numbered for the cylinders. It is important to keep all the parts for each cylinder to gather. And time you reuse old parts they should be put back just like they were.

        When you grind the valves and using the split guides make sure you keep the pairs to gather, mark them when you grind the valve seat so you can put them back the same when you put the valve back in. It is important because the bore some times runs out with the od. Also put the valves back in the same hole they came from.

        The difference between a ok engine and a great engine is attention to detail.

        Comment


        • Mitch
          Mitch commented
          Editing a comment
          Good tip George
          I use a piece of cardboard with holes to keep the valves organized. When i'm done i toss it, but your point on keeping everything as it was is well taken.

      • #22
        Bearing Shim Information:

        Original Thread:
        https://www.vintagefordforum.com/for...ng-brass-shims


        Does anyone know a way to separate (delaminate) the many layers of brass main bearing shims that come laminated together when you buy them?

        Comment


        • Tom Wesenberg
          Tom Wesenberg commented
          Editing a comment
          I use a razor blade, and scratch at the corner until a little tip of one layer starts peeling up. I can then wedge the razor into the stack.

        • DaWizard
          DaWizard commented
          Editing a comment
          Hey Wayne T, WELCOME to the VFF!!

          I agree with Tom, but I use a box cutter knife or my pocket knife. If you are gentle with scraping the edge you can get just one pealed up. I start the peal enough to get a measurement of the lamination thickness, and if it is more than one or two pieces, depending on what I need, you can start at another edge and do the same thing, just lay the first peal back down, it may not laminate again, but that won't hurt it.

        • George Miller
          George Miller commented
          Editing a comment
          plus 3

        • CM2
          CM2 commented
          Editing a comment
          they will curl up at .001...double check your peel,make sure you take off what you want to take off.

        • sunnyorm
          sunnyorm commented
          Editing a comment
          Off the cuff here: submerge in lacquer thinner?

          2manycars: you still have to clean and dry and mic. each one before installation, so just store in a sealed container until use.

        • George Miller
          George Miller commented
          Editing a comment
          Originally posted by WayneT View Post
          Does anyone know a way to separate (delaminate) the many layers of brass main bearing shims that come laminated together when you buy them?
          Also just incase you do not know. To get .001 less clearance you need to take a .001 shim from both sides.

        • BRENT in 10-uh-C
          BRENT in 10-uh-C commented
          Editing a comment
          Easier way is to use a lighter or a propane torch and heat one edge until warm. The heat softens the glue which allows the sharp edge of a razor to glide right under.

        • Ed H
          Ed H commented
          Editing a comment
          Thank you, I was not aware of that. Learn something every time I log on.

        • WayneT
          WayneT commented
          Editing a comment
          Thanks to all for your input, I put a stack in Laquer Thinner last night before I read that idea, will see if it worked!

        • WayneT
          WayneT commented
          Editing a comment
          FYI-- I let a new stack soak in laquer thinner for two days and it did nothing to loosen the layers. I will use Tom & Brents methods, THANKS !!

      • #23
        Main Bearing Oil Feed Holes in Valve Chamber

        Below are 3 pictures showing the main bearing oil feed hole locations in the valve chamber, and also a 4th picture showing the front opening where the oil overflows onto the cam gear. If you are cleaning sludge from the oil pan and valve chamber, be sure to run pipe cleaners up and down each of the oil feed tubes to the main bearings to be sure they are open.

        Comment


        • #24
          Oil Pump Specifications

          Type Pump, splash, gravity feed

          Crankshaft Bearings Gravity feed

          Connecting Rods Splash

          Camshaft Bearings Gravity feed

          Oil Pump Type Gear

          Oil Pump Capacity 9 pints, minimum at 1300 rpm

          Oil Pump Pressure 80-100 pounds

          Oil Pump Shaft 1/2" diameter (in 5/8" bore), except 1928 with 9/16" bore & undercut shaft (Model B used 5/8" bore with undercut shaft)

          Oil Pump Gear Teeth to Housing Clearance .001" to .002"

          Housing Cover to Face of Gears Clearance .001" to .002"

          Drive Gear to Camshaft Gear Clearance .003" to .005"
          2 1930 Tudors

          Henry Ford said
          "It's all nuts and bolts"


          Mitch's Auto Service ctr

          Comment


          • #25
            Cylinder Block Specifications

            Length 19-5/16"

            Width 7-13/16"

            Height 11-1/2"

            Bore 3.875" to 3.876"

            Bottom of Block to Camshaft Centerline 2.876" to 2.878"

            Top of Block to Camshaft Bore Centerline 8.624" to 8.627"

            Valve Lifter & Guide Bore .594" to .5945" diameter

            Distributor Drive Gear Bore .9365" to .9375" diameter

            Cylinder Outside Diameter 4-3/8" outside diameter

            Flatness of Top of Block .003" to .005"

            Cylinder Bore Perpendicular
            to the Top of the Block
            .001" to .002
            2 1930 Tudors

            Henry Ford said
            "It's all nuts and bolts"


            Mitch's Auto Service ctr

            Comment


            • #26
              When you get a crankshaft ground, check it with the front and rear mains on V blocks. Use a dial indicator. Make sure the flywheel flange has no more than .0005 run out. also check center main for run out. They seem to have a hard time getting it right around here. To much run out on the crank flange is going to make it vibrate bad. To much on the center main is going to cost you the center main bearing way early.
              Last edited by George Miller; 03-19-2018, 11:27 AM.

              Comment


              • #27
                image_9958.png
                2 1930 Tudors

                Henry Ford said
                "It's all nuts and bolts"


                Mitch's Auto Service ctr

                Comment

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