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  • Engine Topics

    Here is a compiled list of different topics related to the Model A engine:

    Each area of discussion has a bright red header

    Thanks to George Miller and all the others that contributed to this thread.
    2 1930 Tudors

    Henry Ford said
    "It's all nuts and bolts"


    Mitch's Auto Service ctr

  • #2
    Oil Pump Bushing Replacement


    If you ever need to replace the bushings in your oil pump. Do not drive them out, you might break the pump housing.
    Take a small hack saw blade and cut the bushing into lengthwise, being careful to not saw into the housing. When done take a pice of thread all and put it through the housing hole.Then put a bushing on the thread all, put a big flat washer and nut on each end. then tighten the nut, make sure the bushing is starting straight. Now do the same with the other bushing. Now try the shaft with a little grease on it ,if just a little sung chuck it in your drill press and spin the shaft. Be carefull it does not grab and hurt you. Most of the time this works for me, if to tight you will have to ream the bushing.

    Comment


    • tbirdtbird
      tbirdtbird commented
      Editing a comment
      great advice as always, George

    • Mike V. Florida
      Mike V. Florida commented
      Editing a comment
      I use an Arbor press.

  • #3
    A really good article on installing an oil pan gasket:

    9611ECB1-2DF5-4608-8D9E-1AA710F470E0.pngB355D4D9-6145-4351-89BB-6A2357665258.pngB1A4009B-1547-49D7-A0FB-5EDAE7BEB38D.png





    2 1930 Tudors

    Henry Ford said
    "It's all nuts and bolts"


    Mitch's Auto Service ctr

    Comment


    • #4
      Cylinder Head info and Compression Ratio


      The following images are screen shots from Ford Garage showing a variety of cast iron cylinder heads made for Model A and B Fords and their corresponding compression ratios.

      Also included is a chart which can be used to approximate the CR of a head based on a measurement of it's combustion chamber volume.

      This page covers a variety of heads produced over the years by both Ford and outside suppliers.

      See the link on Ford Garage for more info.

      http://www.fordgarage.com/pages/headcompressionratio.htm

      Comment


      • #5
        Water inlet baffle casting change prior to June 1929 (Marcos Barnyard)

        inlet-1.jpg

        2 1930 Tudors

        Henry Ford said
        "It's all nuts and bolts"


        Mitch's Auto Service ctr

        Comment


        • #6
          Timing Gears Index Marks


          When you install timing gears, be sure they are lined up exactly as in my picture. The cam gear dimple lines up with the right side of the keyway as you face the gears from the front. Some books have mistakenly pictured the dimple lined up on the left side, instead of the correct right side. Don't forget the oil slinger, or the crank pulley may not tighten like it should.

          Timing Gear Marks.jpg
          Attached Files

          Comment


          • #7
            New Engine Break in Procedure


            After a engine is rebuilt how long does it take to break it in 100 miles or more vary the rpm up and down drive slower do not over rev the engine, drain oil and refill after 100 miles. Anything to add to this and also do you use an air filter? Thought this might be a good question to ask. Marvel mystery oil in the gas for upper cylinder lubrication. Also non ethanol premium gasoline.

            Comment


            • Captndan
              Captndan commented
              Editing a comment
              Yes to all of the above including the air filter. Premium is not necessary.

            • Mitch
              Mitch commented
              Editing a comment
              From AER'S site

              4. Do not idle engine to break in. This can cause loss of lubrication to cylinder walls and damage to engine.

              Personally i would dump the oil twice in 100 miles

            • tbirdtbird
              tbirdtbird commented
              Editing a comment
              Miles was taught in resto college to run the engine in at 1/2 your max RPM for 30 min, all the while monitoring temps etc with IR gun etc. Stop at 15 min for a re-torque, then again at 30 min. You'll be surprised at how much you can take up. So, for an A, we set the throttle to 1200. This will give a basic seat to the cam/lifters. Rings will take 1K or more. Iron rings are suggested, not chrome or exotic coatings. He was taught to not baby the motor, get in it and drive it. The RPM will vary enough at stop signs, lights, etc. Accelerate through the gears, do not baby it, you want the dynamic compression of the higher rpms to force the rings against the walls to get a good, more rapid break-in. A slow baby-like approach will cause the rings and walls to glaze over and getting a good seat will be hard. You want a lot of wear in the beginning to avoid a lot of wear later on. Once the cross hatching is gone from the walls getting the rings to seat will be tough, so make it count. It is suggested to avoid synthetic oil for break-in, regarding the older alloys we are dealing with in a vintage vehicle, it is so slippery it can impair break-in. He uses straight 30 wt mineral oil, then you can switch to synthetic after 1K if so desired. We are with Mitch as far as 2 oil changes in 100. We actually dump the oil after that first 30 min run-in.
              Agree with use of MMO. Since crap-a-hol arrived, we use it in all the vintage cars here for valve lube especially. 4oz per 10 gals. We stay away from max rpm until the first 1K, but are not afraid to run up to 1800-2000 rpm.

            • Rowdy
              Rowdy commented
              Editing a comment
              I agree about not babying an engine during the break-in period. When we had our IH H tractor rebuilt many years ago the mechanic who did the rebuild recomended that we put a 2 bottom plow and plow with it for 4 hours for initial break-in, then change oil and retorque head. We followed his recomendation and it was a great tractor for a long time. It would pull the stack mover with two stacks of hay over a long steep hill in 3rd gear with moderate effort. Even our IH M would not make the hill in 3rd, had to have it in 2nd to make the same pull. Rod

            • BILL WILLIAMSON
              BILL WILLIAMSON commented
              Editing a comment
              I just drive them NORMALLY, if set up RIGHT, they'll just do what they're supposed to do!!
              Chief always sed, "Break em in FAST & they'll always be a FAST car"! (NOT necessarily recommending that!)
              Bill Nottoworry

            • plyfor
              plyfor commented
              Editing a comment
              just did break in with 10 30 detergent; now at 60 miles, too early to use 15-40 Rotella? I also put a little ZDDP in oil .

            • tbirdtbird
              tbirdtbird commented
              Editing a comment
              If not already changed, I would be comfortable with draining out that 10-30, and going to the Rotella. They have decreased the zinc in Rotella, BTW. The manufacturers have to guarantee the cat to 120K, and they would rather deliver on that than on good lube qualities. Nothing wrong with adding some ZDDP if you like. I have an engine builders bible that suggests not just cam/tappets benefit from zinc, but all bearing and friction surfaces, contrary to popular belief. A. Graham Bell has written extensively on engine building, tuning, and oil. Yes we know there was no zinc in 1930. But why shun modern chemistry?

              There are those that say any oil will do. I would love to see a scientific or professional reference to that. Maybe, maybe not. At the very least consider detergent oil. The more engines you work on, the more you will believe that. I am of the opinion that those that propose non-D have not taken apart very many engines....Maybe any oil will work, but since you just dropped 3500 for an overhaul, why not use the best you can?

              Having said that once we get to 1K miles, we switch to a multiweight Mobil oil, and no longer consider zinc. For that first 1K, we use Valvoline Racing straight 30, which has about the highest zinc available.

              As always your mileage may vary!

            • Mitch
              Mitch commented
              Editing a comment
              I wouldn't have a problem using it

            • BNCHIEF
              BNCHIEF commented
              Editing a comment
              I concur with everything said here I am running the rotella was only going to add the zddp after first oil change, was always taught to vary the rpm not wide open 1200 is a good rule of thumb let engine pull a little do not lug it. Good points on retorqueing, car has a new radiator and leakless water pump and no temp issues at all. I also pulls well and runs smoothly with no vibration not to me anyway but if you do not over rev it.

            • BNCHIEF
              BNCHIEF commented
              Editing a comment
              Absolutely right about synthetic good oil but not for break in.

            • BNCHIEF
              BNCHIEF commented
              Editing a comment
              Definite no-no concur with you Mitch. Twice it will be I also run it thru a paint strainer and look for metal. Warm of course.

            • plyfor
              plyfor commented
              Editing a comment
              thanks for the comments; had a little sludge in the pan bottom probably due to new babbitt which I assume is normal. The oil pump screen was cleanBTW, the Porsche Club of America did a research (published) study on zinc attributes with horiz opposed cyl. motors broken down and parts compared. Should be able to find it on-line.

            • BNCHIEF
              BNCHIEF commented
              Editing a comment
              Tbird i am running an oil filter and changing oil more frequently than would be normal in a modern car I do like synthetics when engine is broken in but not sure about a model a. I know many say you do not need an air filter but I always say really than look at the air filter in your modern car. Renners did my carb and pressure balanced it.

            • DaWizard
              DaWizard commented
              Editing a comment
              I understand the need for changing the oil at the first hour or so running, but is this true using a full flow oil filter as well? I have built in the oil filter, it is the first thing the oil sees from the pump.

            • Mitch
              Mitch commented
              Editing a comment
              I would change the oil and filter bro
              You have a large investment

          • #8
            Schwalms cutaway engine / trans!
            2 1930 Tudors

            Henry Ford said
            "It's all nuts and bolts"


            Mitch's Auto Service ctr

            Comment


            • #9
              Oil pan gasket installation and sealing tips

              I also like the cork pan gasket, and I like to use a stick-um to hold it to the engine block, then a light coat of grease on the pan lip. This way the gasket stays in place and the pan should easily come off to check bearings. These pictures are from a customer's house and he had white lithium grease on hand. I usually like to use Mystik JT-6 red high temp grease for assembly, but this engine was started within a few days, so the white lithium didn't get a chance to separate or dry out.

              I cut a U shape in the front of the side gaskets to fit around the rope seal. Most times I have to trim a little of the rope, but leave enough to compress when the pan is bolted on. I also never soak rope seals, but tuck them into the groove, then form them with a socket, then oil and grease them. Notice I seal the rear main cap and bolts also.

              Comment


              • tbirdtbird
                tbirdtbird commented
                Editing a comment
                Tom, we can never get the blue RTV to seal against petroleum, so we always use Permatex Ultra Black RTV.
                Not sure why the blue works for you

            • #10
              Oil pan showing the dipper tray


              8CA9807C-C14B-4F9C-9CBC-2A0D574AD1B8L0001.jpg
              2 1930 Tudors

              Henry Ford said
              "It's all nuts and bolts"


              Mitch's Auto Service ctr

              Comment


              • #11
                'What's are the differences in the Ford A, B and C engines?'


                The 1932 V-8 was introduced as the 'Ford Model 18.' The four cylinder model was designated the 'Model B.' Although the V-8 was a national sensation and sold very well, there were many four cylinder Model B's produced. Compression of the Model B engine was 4.8; the A was 4.2. The Model B engine produced 50 hp at 2800 rpm; the A produced 40 hp at 2200 rpm. The Model 'B' mains were 2" diameter; mains in the 'A' were 1-5/8". 'B' rods were 1-7/8"; A rods were 1-1/2". The 'B' camshaft provided an increase in valve timing duration which contributed to the 50 hp at 2800 rpm. A diaphragm type fuel pump was mounted to the lower right side of the engine block. The water pump mounted with three bolts instead of four. The oil pump forced oil directly to the main bearings under mild pressure. Along with other valve chamber modifications, the oil return pipe was eliminated. Model 'C;' The 1933-34 Ford four cylinder engine has been unofficially dubbed the Model 'C.' photo of C head here This designation cannot be found in Ford literature or correspondence. It is strictly a user connotation. Changes from the 'B' to the 'C' engine included: a crank shaft employing integrally forged counterbalances, a shortened three bolt water water pump housing and a 39 pound flywheel compared to a 62-1/2 pound flywheel provided with the Model 'A.' (The counterbalances make up the difference.) There were 263,765 Model 'B' (and 'C') engines produced between March 9, 1932 and late 1934.

                Ford produced the Model 'B' 4 cylinder engine from 1932 - 1934, concurrently with the V-8.


                Some noticeable differences between the A and B engines.


                The Model "A" engine has a oil return tube on the right side of the engine, that extends

                from the lower left corner of the valve cover to the lower right corner of the block. The

                "B" engine has no external oil return tube.

                The Model "B" engine has a small port on the right side just below the valve chamber

                cover for a cam driven fuel pump. This port will either have a fuel pump attached or

                have a triangular shaped plate covering the hole.

                Both engines use the same manifold gasket. The "A" and "B" manifolds are

                interchangeable for either engine. The differences in exhaust manifolds is the angle of

                the exhaust tube at the end of the manifold. The "A" is at about 90 degrees (drops

                almost straight down) and the "B" manifold drops off at about a 45 degree angle.


                Answer above by John Hargrave, Technical Director, MAFCA


                -----------------------------------------------------------------------


                Modifications to the B engine included "pressure" feed to the main and cam bearings ; hence there was no need to partially fill the valve chamber with oil so that it could feed by gravity through tubes or holes to these bearings. Rather, oil was pumped directly into a gallery below the chamber and through holes which fed the main and cam bearings. The oil return pipe on the A engine carried away the overage and also cooled the oil as it was returned to the pan.

                To understand why this was done, one must consider the engineering of the time. With respect to the main bearings of the crankshaft, Favary (see "Motor Vehicle Engineering - Engines" McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc.) had this to say in 1926: "When the linear speed of the bearings exceeds 1000 feet per minute, it is most important to maintain a film of oil between the bearing surfaces, hence pressure feed for such bearings in high-speed engines is essential." It should also be noted that a certain volume of oil must also circulate through the bearings to cool them.

                Since the main bearing journal size on the B engine was increased to 2" from the 1 5/8" diameter of the Model A, and the engine was rated 50 hp at 2800 rpm instead of the previous 40 at 2250, this linear speed of the crankshaft was thus likely to exceed that which was considered "safe" for adequate lubrication using just gravity feed. At these rated speeds, the A crank linear speed is about 957 ft. per minute; the B is a touch over 1465 ft. per minute.


                The above article by Phil Mino


                ---------------------------------------------------------------------


                The B Engine has bigger bearing surfaces on the crank, which means tougher bearings that can take higher speeds and compression. The later couonterweighted ones can be balanced very nicely, although a balanced non-counterweighted one is also smooth. The main bearings are pressurized, meaning they will be cooled and lubed better. Its not a difficult thing to have the crank drilled out to pressurize the rod bearings as well. The weakness in the B block is that they tend to crack between the #4 exhaust valve and the cylinder, sometimes in other cylinders too. These cracks can be repaired sometimes. The block should always be magnafluxed before rebuilding it, to insure it is sound. The exhaust and intake ports are shaped for better breathing and ported to allow more air in and out. You can put a B carb on there with a B manifold and get the original higher 50 horsepower, but with a high compression head, you can really get a boost out of the engine.
                The Difference, Ford A,B & C En
                2 1930 Tudors

                Henry Ford said
                "It's all nuts and bolts"


                Mitch's Auto Service ctr

                Comment


                • #12
                  Here's a few cutaway displays in the Model A museum at Gilmore.


                  Comment


                  • #13
                    Look in the VFF Articles Forum for:

                    The Evolution of the Model A Engine Block
                    The Evolution of the Model A Oil Pump
                    2 1930 Tudors

                    Henry Ford said
                    "It's all nuts and bolts"


                    Mitch's Auto Service ctr

                    Comment


                    • #14
                      Tightening the Cam Gear / Timing Gear

                      The best way to hold the timing gear when tightening the timing gear nut to 100 ft lbs, is take the side cover off and put a good clamp across the gear below the teeth. That will take all the strain off the gear teeth.

                      Comment


                      • DaWizard
                        DaWizard commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Ya know, I too agree with the statement, but I would ask for clarification as the clamps my mind conjures might hurt the gear.

                        ie: C-clamp would put all the pressure on the gear in a small area.
                        The HF spring clamps wouldn't hold
                        Possibly a pipe style clamp would put the pressure across a greater area on the gear, but would it hold?

                        Just random musings from a troubled mind...

                      • Mitch
                        Mitch commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Here is something i had saved on my comp from Dan about cam gears!

                        "On the cam gear nut- you don't want to use the teeth to stop the rotation of the cam. Best way is to remove the cam gear side cover, and clamp a bar of metal to the rim of the cam gear with a few c clamps and let the bar stop the cam rotation- you can put some sheetmetal between the c clamp and the gear face to keep from damaging the gear. Make sure the face of the cam is clean and burr free before putting the new gear on the cam. To put the crank gear on, heat it up to about 325/375 degrees and it will almost slide on- work fast and have a piece of pipe or tubing handy to seat the gear on the crankshaft with some hammer blows. Tighten the nut to at least 50 ft-lbs. Regards, Dan "

                      • DaWizard
                        DaWizard commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Thanks Mitch, that makes perfect sense.

                      • BILL WILLIAMSON
                        BILL WILLIAMSON commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Dave "trusted" the teeth & Marla held it with the crookedy crank, while he torqued it to105 Ft Lbs!---DON'T MESS WITH THAT WOMAN!!!
                        KDad

                      • BILL WILLIAMSON
                        BILL WILLIAMSON commented
                        Editing a comment
                        [QUOTE=BILL WILLIAMSON;n30687]Dave "trusted" the teeth & Marla held it with the crookedy crank, while he torqued it to105 Ft Lbs!---DON'T MESS WITH THAT WOMAN!!!
                        Dave did good, as I walked him through the whole operation, Via Blue Tooth. Why do they call it Blue Tooth?? Why not Blue Ear???--The WORLD is KRAZY & they wurry about my SANITY???--The Dog thinks I know EVERYTHING.
                        KDad


                      • tbirdtbird
                        tbirdtbird commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Dan iz the man, he was always perplexed that ppl were using 100lbs of torque.

                        After all, it isn't a 1600 HP Caterpillar engine!

                    • #15
                      Tapping Blocks with a Standard Hardware Tap

                      You should not re tap your block with a standard tap. The factory used a tighter class tap. If you tap it with a standard tap the stud will be looser in the block than it should be. Which will weaken the threads in the block.

                      Comment


                      • Mitch
                        Mitch commented
                        Editing a comment
                        George do you have a link or info on the proper tap that should be used?

                      • tbirdtbird
                        tbirdtbird commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Maybe this will help, although I am unable to find these special taps in McMaster-Carr
                        https://www.newmantools.com/taps/taptech.htm#cla

                        George, what is your tool source? Goodson?


                      • Big hammer
                        Big hammer commented
                        Editing a comment
                        I have Snap-on or Blue point re-threaders that are nylon, taps and dies,
                        course thread and fine. They do not remove metal only junk!

                      • Mike V. Florida
                        Mike V. Florida commented
                        Editing a comment
                        I read from Kevin in NJ "My experiences since have found Ford used the Class III threads in many other areas. Now I hand clean all the nuts in bolts just to be safe."

                      • Mike V. Florida
                        Mike V. Florida commented
                        Editing a comment

                      • Tom Wesenberg
                        Tom Wesenberg commented
                        Editing a comment
                        I use a Dremel with a thin cut off wheel, or a hacksaw, to cut 4 slots into a bolt. This works great to remove junk without removing good metal.

                    • #16
                      Cheap and easy test to check for bad valves

                      To check for burnt valves, turn you ignition off and turn the engine over with the starter. If it speeds up on compression stroke, you probably need a valve job. this is just a quick check, you still need to check with a gauge to be sure.

                      Years ago a Guy came in with a 56 chev V8 it had less than 50,000 miles. He was a mechanic at the county garage. He said he wanted a valve job. Next day I check it because chev V8's do not need a valve job with those low miles. I checked it with out the ignition on. It checked fine. It was a bad plug wire. When he came back to get it with his wife, she gave him a hard time because he was wrong. I think he would have been happier if I would have done a valve job.

                      Comment


                      • tbirdtbird
                        tbirdtbird commented
                        Editing a comment
                        anybody can be wrong once in a while

                      • Mitch
                        Mitch commented
                        Editing a comment
                        You can hear the skip from low or no compression in a single cylinder due to many reasons, valves, Head gasket etc

                      • sphanna
                        sphanna commented
                        Editing a comment
                        If you hold a dollar bill (for example) over the exhaust pipe exit when engine is idling and the bill slaps the pipe on the intake strokes, I think this also indicates a leaking exhaust valve. Whadda U think? Am I thinking right here?

                      • Ed H
                        Ed H commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Leakage test, fast and accurate. Takes but a few minutes.
                        Of course you can do a compression test, but that does not tell you which valve is bad.

                    • #17
                      Cylinder Head Torque Info

                      C51B318B-D4CC-4338-8D75-AD093097A4F9L0001.jpg
                      2 1930 Tudors

                      Henry Ford said
                      "It's all nuts and bolts"


                      Mitch's Auto Service ctr

                      Comment


                      • #18
                        Getting out head studs:

                        I have been helping a couple of friends build a hill climb engine. It had 8 studs that would not come out. Bill DeVore and Steven Grace are the two guys. They came up with a neat idea how to get them out. They took some 1/2 inch plastic conduit cut it about 3/4 long and glued it to the block around the stud. Then filled it with penetrating oil. Then let it set for a few days. It worked.

                        Comment


                        • tbirdtbird
                          tbirdtbird commented
                          Editing a comment
                          hmmmm
                          George you are making me think of how I unseize pistons that are stuck at TDC... an engine builder supremo friend of mine taught me years ago to make a dam from modeling clay around the top of the bore (not PlayDoh), to contain the MMO which you then let sit there for as long as it took, replenishing as needed.

                          Now it occurs to me you could do the same thing around frozen studs too!!

                        • Mitch
                          Mitch commented
                          Editing a comment
                          That is a nice tip and another good option to add to the arsenal

                        • Tom Wesenberg
                          Tom Wesenberg commented
                          Editing a comment
                          A few years ago I first heard about heating the stud, then melt wax against it so the wax will be sucked into the threads as the stud cools.
                          I haven't tried it yet, but have heard from others that say it works for them.

                        • BNCHIEF
                          BNCHIEF commented
                          Editing a comment
                          In the past I have put parts that were rusted solid in a tray of diesel fuel and left them for a week it would free them up. That tube idea is a good one.

                        • Mitch
                          Mitch commented
                          Editing a comment
                          George what did you use for glue?

                        • George Miller
                          George Miller commented
                          Editing a comment
                          On that same engine some one in the past had broken 3 studs off flush with the top of the block. So we put it in the mill and put the head on with a few studs. Then we took a drill that just fit in the head. Drill a starting angle in the broken stud. Then took the head off and used a drill 2 sizes under the tap size. Then took the right size for a 7/14 tap and drilled it through the old stud, being sure to stop before drill through the block. Then took a tap, supported it with a center in the chuck on the mill. Went real careful so as not to break the tap. If you break the tap then you have a real problem. We got them out and the holes are great.

                          I have heard about welding a nut to the stud, but I'm a farm welder, did not want to try it on this engine.

                        • BNCHIEF
                          BNCHIEF commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Tig welding works and it is how my engine builder gets a broken one out the guys at Berts remove a lot of them I will have to ask his builder what he does.

                        • George Miller
                          George Miller commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Getting out broken head studs:

                          A couple of ways to get broken head studs out. One way is to get two sleeves made that will go in the bolt holes in the head. Put a shoulder on the top so you can get them back out. They should slide in the head hole but not be loose. Make one a two drill sizes smaller than the tap drill size. Then put the head on the block, mark the drill for the right depth so you do not drill through bottom of the hole. drill it out, now put the sleeve in for the drill size of the tap drill now do the same as the first drill. Now the hard part. Take the head off. Now you can take a block of steel drill a 90 degree hole the size of the tap make sure it is 90 degrees all the way around. Now tap the hole, go real slow, back it out often.

                          Go slow and easy with the tap, if you break a tap in the hole you will have real trouble.

                      • #19
                        AER’s Rear Main Oil Leak Diagnosis:







                        PROVERBIAL REAR MAIN LEAK


                        After 30 plus years of experience with the Model A & B engines, the most common problem is a rear main oil leak. This problem can be very simple to correct or it can turn into costly time consuming job. What is important is a correct diagnoses. You do not want to rebuild engine if you have a bad oil filler cap. Do not assume the worst until you have checked out the problem thoroughly.

                        1. After wiping clean flywheel housing. Check that oil is leaking from out of cotter pin hole at bottom of flywheel housing. If oil does not leak out of cotter pin hole you have a leak some place else, suggestions oil pan, timing case cover, front seal, valve cover, oil pipe to mention a few. Most oil leaks drip off of the cotter pin. You need to determine that oil is leaking out of cotter pin hole not off of the cotter pin to be a rear main leak. If oil is leaking out of cotter pin hole go to step 2.

                        2. Remove oil filler cap check to see that oil filler pipe is not restricted or plugged. With oil filler cap removed from car take car for a drive. If leak stopped the oil filler cap is bad. There are tabs bent over under top of cap to stop cap from seating all the way down. The stops could be bent or missing on your cap. This will seal crankcase pressures in and will force oil out. Replace oil filler cap. This is a common problem, overlooked and easy to fix.

                        3. Hold a plastic food storage bag around oil filler pipe and bring engine to high idle. Bag should flutter if does not and fills up with air, you have excessive blow by in crankcase. This can be caused by bad rings, pistons, cylinders or possibly valves and guides. Excessive pressures in crankcase will cause oil to leak out rear main and any other place not sealed.

                        4. If above is all good now remove half moon inspection cover on flywheel housing, three hex head screws. Chock wheels. Check to see if inside of flywheel is wet with oil. If flywheel is wet inside this means oil is leaking out rear main cap and or cap to block. Start engine, with flash light look for oil leak. EXHAUST IS HOT AND MUST BE VENTED.

                        POSSIBLE PLACES FOR OIL LEAK.
                        Checking inside flywheel housing with half moon cover removed.
                        Engine running

                        A. Dripping or running down right side of engine around outside of rear main cap. Probably gasket between engine and flywheel housing. Remove engine and replace gasket. We seal around camshaft hole with RTV no longer use a gasket.

                        B. Dripping between rear main cap and block at shims. Cap must fit flat to engine block. Rear seal part A6335 must be filed flat with block. I use a thin film of RTV on both sides of shim to prevent leakage.

                        C. Dripping out side of rear main block could be oil running up rear main bolts, I use RTV under heads of the rear main bolts and on threads of the two upper bolts that secure flywheel housing to block. These leaks are generally slow drips and are not common.

                        D. Dripping or running out of back of rear main cap into flywheel is common. This is a rear main leak. If you have not seen oil leak at this time take car for a drive, immediately chock wheels and check again. If rear main leaks. Remove oil pan.

                        E. Check oil tube on rear main cap that it is not missing, broken or cut off. The end of this pipe must be in oil in bottom of sump. If pipe is not in oil, pressures in crankcase will blow oil out rear main. If pipe is screwed into cap too far this will restrict oil flow back to sump and cause rear main leak. The oil galley plug in rear main should be installed again to stop crankcase pressures from pushing oil out rear main. Next remove rear main cap, oil galley in cap must be open and clean so oil can flow back to sump. With cap removed from engine you can now inspect Babbitt for wear, cracks chips, ECT. The last quarter inch of the bearing must be full diameter of Babbitt no cuts, grooves or chips. Shims must fit tight to crankshaft . Plastigage can be used to check bearing clearance at this time with engine still in car. I suggest a jack be used to apply pressure upward on crankshaft. This will seat crankshaft up into bearings in block to give you an accurate measurement. Desired clearance is .001 to .0015.

                        By now you should have diagnosed the problem. I hope that your problem was easy to fix. I have seen newly rebuilt engines leak and many times it was just the oil filler cap. Do not assume the worst till you have checked out the problem thoroughly


                        http://www.antiqueenginerebuilding.c...RMAINLEAK.html

                        2 1930 Tudors

                        Henry Ford said
                        "It's all nuts and bolts"


                        Mitch's Auto Service ctr

                        Comment


                        • #20
                          Bolt hole next to the camshaft on the rear of the engine. Poss source of oil leak


                          To day while tearing a engine apart that got flood water in it some time ago. I remembered the cause of some rear main leaks that gets over looked. On some engines one of the bolt holes next to the cam shaft on the rear of the engine goes all the way into the inside of the engine. This engine is one of them, in this case it leaked so much oil it helped save the out side of the engine.
                          Check any engine that you have apart. If the hole goes inside, seal the bolt with RTV.

                          Comment


                          • Dennis
                            Dennis commented
                            Editing a comment
                            George you confirmed what might be where I have a leak inside my flywheel housing. The only bolts I didn't seal back there.

                        • #21
                          Tip on grinding A valves

                          When grinding valves and using the old parts. I made a wood box that has 8 compartments and 8 holes drilled in back of the compartments. to hold the valves, and parts for each cylinder. They are numbered for the cylinders. It is important to keep all the parts for each cylinder to gather. And time you reuse old parts they should be put back just like they were.

                          When you grind the valves and using the split guides make sure you keep the pairs to gather, mark them when you grind the valve seat so you can put them back the same when you put the valve back in. It is important because the bore some times runs out with the od. Also put the valves back in the same hole they came from.

                          The difference between a ok engine and a great engine is attention to detail.

                          Comment


                          • Mitch
                            Mitch commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Good tip George
                            I use a piece of cardboard with holes to keep the valves organized. When i'm done i toss it, but your point on keeping everything as it was is well taken.

                        • #22
                          Shim Information thread 1:

                          Original Thread:
                          https://www.vintagefordforum.com/for...ng-brass-shims


                          Does anyone know a way to separate (delaminate) the many layers of brass main bearing shims that come laminated together when you buy them?

                          Comment


                          • Tom Wesenberg
                            Tom Wesenberg commented
                            Editing a comment
                            I use a razor blade, and scratch at the corner until a little tip of one layer starts peeling up. I can then wedge the razor into the stack.

                          • DaWizard
                            DaWizard commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Hey Wayne T, WELCOME to the VFF!!

                            I agree with Tom, but I use a box cutter knife or my pocket knife. If you are gentle with scraping the edge you can get just one pealed up. I start the peal enough to get a measurement of the lamination thickness, and if it is more than one or two pieces, depending on what I need, you can start at another edge and do the same thing, just lay the first peal back down, it may not laminate again, but that won't hurt it.

                          • George Miller
                            George Miller commented
                            Editing a comment
                            plus 3

                          • CM2
                            CM2 commented
                            Editing a comment
                            they will curl up at .001...double check your peel,make sure you take off what you want to take off.

                          • sunnyorm
                            sunnyorm commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Off the cuff here: submerge in lacquer thinner?

                            2manycars: you still have to clean and dry and mic. each one before installation, so just store in a sealed container until use.

                          • George Miller
                            George Miller commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Originally posted by WayneT View Post
                            Does anyone know a way to separate (delaminate) the many layers of brass main bearing shims that come laminated together when you buy them?
                            Also just incase you do not know. To get .001 less clearance you need to take a .001 shim from both sides.

                          • BRENT in 10-uh-C
                            BRENT in 10-uh-C commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Easier way is to use a lighter or a propane torch and heat one edge until warm. The heat softens the glue which allows the sharp edge of a razor to glide right under.

                          • Ed H
                            Ed H commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Thank you, I was not aware of that. Learn something every time I log on.

                          • WayneT
                            WayneT commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Thanks to all for your input, I put a stack in Laquer Thinner last night before I read that idea, will see if it worked!

                          • WayneT
                            WayneT commented
                            Editing a comment
                            FYI-- I let a new stack soak in laquer thinner for two days and it did nothing to loosen the layers. I will use Tom & Brents methods, THANKS !!

                        • #23
                          Main Bearing Oil Feed Holes in Valve Chamber

                          Below are 3 pictures showing the main bearing oil feed hole locations in the valve chamber, and also a 4th picture showing the front opening where the oil overflows onto the cam gear. If you are cleaning sludge from the oil pan and valve chamber, be sure to run pipe cleaners up and down each of the oil feed tubes to the main bearings to be sure they are open.

                          Comment


                          • #24
                            Oil Pump Specifications

                            Type Pump, splash, gravity feed

                            Crankshaft Bearings Gravity feed

                            Connecting Rods Splash

                            Camshaft Bearings Gravity feed

                            Oil Pump Type Gear

                            Oil Pump Capacity 9 pints, minimum at 1300 rpm

                            Oil Pump Pressure 80-100 pounds

                            Oil Pump Shaft 1/2" diameter (in 5/8" bore), except 1928 with 9/16" bore & undercut shaft (Model B used 5/8" bore with undercut shaft)

                            Oil Pump Gear Teeth to Housing Clearance .001" to .002"

                            Housing Cover to Face of Gears Clearance .001" to .002"

                            Drive Gear to Camshaft Gear Clearance .003" to .005"
                            2 1930 Tudors

                            Henry Ford said
                            "It's all nuts and bolts"


                            Mitch's Auto Service ctr

                            Comment


                            • #25
                              Cylinder Block Specifications

                              Length 19-5/16"

                              Width 7-13/16"

                              Height 11-1/2"

                              Bore 3.875" to 3.876"

                              Bottom of Block to Camshaft Centerline 2.876" to 2.878"

                              Top of Block to Camshaft Bore Centerline 8.624" to 8.627"

                              Valve Lifter & Guide Bore .594" to .5945" diameter

                              Distributor Drive Gear Bore .9365" to .9375" diameter

                              Cylinder Outside Diameter 4-3/8" outside diameter

                              Flatness of Top of Block .003" to .005"

                              Cylinder Bore Perpendicular
                              to the Top of the Block
                              .001" to .002
                              2 1930 Tudors

                              Henry Ford said
                              "It's all nuts and bolts"


                              Mitch's Auto Service ctr

                              Comment

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