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7 Tooth

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  • 7 Tooth

    Original Thread

    My new (used) 7 tooth looks great ! Thanks Tom for working hard to get it for me !!! Very tight with really no wear on gears. I will use a lighter grease than they used for sure. The grease was pushed away from gears not doing much.

  • #2
    That screw and nut is for the sector shaft end play adjustment, and where the end plate and light switch attach, there are brass shims to adjust the steering shaft end play.

    Comment


    • #3
      That screw and nut is for the sector shaft end play adjustment, and where the end plate and light switch attach, there are brass shims to adjust the steering shaft end play.

      Comment


      • #4
        I'll have you check it out when your down, but it looks really nice. I'll need a gasket, but I'll look through Wills stuff first or use gasket sealer ?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by pAAt View Post
          I will use a lighter grease than they used for sure. The grease was pushed away from gears not doing much.
          Don't use grease in the 7 tooth gearbox. Use 600W oil, same as that used in the transmission and differential. Grease will just get pushed away from the sector and worm.

          There is, however, a grease fitting on the sector shaft. The sector shaft bushings should be installed so that the open end of the groove in the bushing faces the grease fitting opening, that is, they should both face the middle of the sector shaft. Some of the vendors replacement bushings are too long, and will block the grease fitting opening. If that occurs, drill the opening. Be certain that grease can enter the sector housing between the two bushings so that it can flow into each bushing. I use a high pressure chassis grease in that fitting.

          Use the new style light switch tube when rebuilding. The top of the tube is above the oil fill level, and will avoid oil leaking out the bottom through the light switch.

          Be sure that the top and bottom bushings are a good fit on the steering shaft. The bearings used in the 7 tooth steering box are the same as the king-pin bearings. End play in the steering shaft is controlled by brass shims where the light switch tube bolts to the bottom of the box.

          Good luck on your rebuild

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          • #6
            Thanks for all the input GRutter ! I'll be getting back to you if I have troubles, so I'll be back !! pAAt

            GRutter, it's to late Who ever had this sector previously used grease and it was pushed away from all moving parts. It left them all dry with no lubrication, so damn with no water !!
            Last edited by pAAt; 05-16-2018, 04:33 AM.

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            • #7
              On the lower steering bearing assembly, the bushing is grooved up pretty bad and will need replacing. On the lighting contacts is it worth it to solder new wiring to the terminals ? Contacts look great, but are they original ? Pat

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              • DaWizard
                DaWizard commented
                Editing a comment
                Pat, IF you decide to keep that switch base and solder wires to it, be very careful to not over heat the bakelite base. If you have a pair of tweezers that you need to squeeze to open, they will work as a heat sink.

              • pAAt
                pAAt commented
                Editing a comment
                Thanks Wiz !! If I can't F it up nobody can !!!!

            • #8
              Good thoughts Wiz
              Or spray the base of the terminals and the Bakelite with this
              2 1930 Tudors

              Henry Ford said
              "It's all nuts and bolts"


              Mitch's Auto Service ctr

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              • pAAt
                pAAt commented
                Editing a comment
                Like I got that kinda money, Mitch !!!!

            • #9
              GRutter, are you talking this retainer with tube (1st pic) ? I have a other few problems, not visible to my untrained eye at first. There was no lower bearing on the shaft and the lower splines are chewed up some. ( this unit had to have been taken apart, looked at and put back together ) The shaft is straight and the worm looks good. There are groves on the end shaft that goes into the lower bushing with the lower bushing looking the same.

              I've been told to replace the shaft, worm, and do a total rebuild. That would be not an option at this time for me. I have ordered an undersized bushing and will try to clean up the end shaft to fit. I ordered 3 bearings in case I have a bad idea. These are thrust bearings only (?) and I figure I can tack weld/file up the splines a bit so these bearing have a bit of centering hold.


              With this all being said, what advise could you give me on my project ? pAAt

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              • #10
                pAAt, I rebuilt my 7 tooth and replaced everything but the side cover, the sector adjusting bolt and nut, and the part that holds the lower bushing. I bought a reproduction part for down at the bottom and it was way off dimension and I would have had to machine it down to fit properly with shims. If my memory is correct, the bottom seal with the brass tube when compared to the placement of the upper bushing was below the level where the upper bushing is located in the housing. The original lower seal was the blame for my steering shaft to get chewed up plus lack of lubrication for the upper bushing. I suppose it could have been welded up and turned down, but the pinion is critical for centering on the shaft, therefore I bought a new shaft with pinion gear from Snyder's. Also on the sector shaft I made a retainer plate from a large but thin washer and welded 2 small washers on each side to keep surfaces flat and not overstrain the mounting ears, all to hold an o-ring seal against the bushing and housing. I didn't like how thick the o-ring is from I think Bratton's and I found a thinner one in my stash of o-rings. It does not leak a drop. Those grease fittings have a spring loaded ball and will have very little leak. I experienced the too long bushing syndrome for the sector shaft and made either a slot or a hole to allow lube into the bottom fitting. New bushings required very little to get a good fit, and possibly no bushing reaming or honing, I honed very little on the inside of the bushing to get the gear teeth to fit closest together. I also welded a small boss on the housing about middle of upper bushing for a grease fitting, only used as a plug. No grease anywhere, only 600W.

                Comment


                • pAAt
                  pAAt commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Thanks Dennis for all your information and the retainer plate sounds like a good thing to do. I'm waiting on the parts to see how bad off it is and give it a cheap try. Nothing to lose really but a few bucks. I sure didn't expect such a big job in restoring/fixing a steering column, but then I thought restoring an A would be a piece of cake ! Live, Learn, and Love Thanks

              • #11
                Steering column parts came today. I installed thrust bearings, lower bushing, light rod felt seal, o-ring/washer, adjusted end play, mounted on frame, and filled with 600w. Will check for leaks tomorrow, the steering feels good with very little play. Pat

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