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  • Things to do once you purchased your new A

    So this thread deals with things that should be done once you get your new car home.

    I'll start with at the bare minimum check all the main fluids, trans, differential, engine and coolant. Many folks are in such a hurry from excitement to drive the car, but if the rear or trans is empty from a slow leak over a period of time your going to do some major damage.
    The right thing to do is change out all the fluids....
    3 ~ Tudor's
    Henry Ford said
    "It's all nuts and bolts"


    Mitch's Auto Service ctr

  • #2
    Take your favorite decent pressure grease gun and the Lube chart and attack each lube point vigorously.

    ALWAYS check the lights!! Mine arrived with a burnt harness and not even a shadow of the brake light switch.
    You wana look waaay far up da road and plan yer route because the brakes are far more of a suggestion than a command!

    Comment


    • #3
      Lube as mentioned above and then give it a good inspection of safety items followed by a shakedown cruise. Put it through its paces and try to get a feel for issues that need addressed. Be prepared for this ending badly if it has been a trailerqueen or only driven in parades. Not all restorations are equal. Rod
      Much of the social history of the Western world, over the past three decades, has been a history of replacing what worked with what sounded good.

      Comment


      • #4
        Check the front end for slop, pull the wheels and check the brakes and at the same time repack the front and rear wheel bearings.
        (A common place for steering slop is the sector to pitman arm connection. Ck this with wheels on the ground while someone works the steering wheel for you)

        3 ~ Tudor's
        Henry Ford said
        "It's all nuts and bolts"


        Mitch's Auto Service ctr

        Comment


        • #5
          Check your checking account first and foremost!!

          Comment


          • Captndan
            Captndan commented
            Editing a comment
            You should have done this before the purchase.

        • #6
          Check for gas leak by looking for discoloration on either side of the firewall.
          Disconnect ground cable until you have inspected the wiring.

          Comment


          • #7
            Air the tires including the spare
            3 ~ Tudor's
            Henry Ford said
            "It's all nuts and bolts"


            Mitch's Auto Service ctr

            Comment


            • #8
              Put mine up on jack stands, pulled the radiator(replaced) front end good got rid of white lithium grease repacked wheel bearings new brake shoes and drum front and rear and new grease seals got all shocks working no slop anywhere. rebuilt and sealed steering gear. fixed horn pulled gas tank cleaned and reinstalled with new welt. Went thru tranny new bearings sealed the whole thing up. New bumpers and added oil pressure and water temp gauges. Rebuilt motor balanced, inserts and no oil leaks on this car.

              Comment


              • #9
                Some common sore spots that should be checked are the distributor lower plate wire for condition. If you have the lower wireless plate you might want to consider going back to the wired style. The cheap repo ignition switches are notorious for intermittent contact when switched to the on position. ( the fake look alike pop out's from Nurex are a good quality and choice).
                3 ~ Tudor's
                Henry Ford said
                "It's all nuts and bolts"


                Mitch's Auto Service ctr

                Comment


                • Beauford
                  Beauford commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Thank goodness I have a NuRex

              • #10
                Don't fill the radiator tank to the top as it will upchuck out the overflow and make you think your overheating, not to mention a mess. The proper coolant level is just at the level of the baffle plate in the upper tank
                3 ~ Tudor's
                Henry Ford said
                "It's all nuts and bolts"


                Mitch's Auto Service ctr

                Comment


                • #11
                  Get to the DMV and get your paper work taken care of :-)
                  Next go to the insurance company
                  After all the maintenance listed above
                  have some real fun and get it on the road, cars that sit need to be driven!

                  Comment


                  • #12
                    If your car has no battery disconnect or fuse to cutoff the battery, install one. I HATE FIRES !

                    Comment


                    • #13
                      I didn't see it mentioned. Check for loose bolts, nuts, fasteners. Both of my rear axle nuts were loose as was one of the front spring perches. Make it a routine to check fasteners while working on your car.

                      Comment


                      • #14
                        It's a great idea to purchase a few of these books:

                        The ""Service Bulletins"'
                        This was the ford shop manual back when the cars were produced. They are actually a continuation from the Model T era that's why the page numbers do not start at #1. There are various copies of these available on the market, so some are an easier read (size wise) than others but they all contain approx the same information. Out of all the versions the Ben Staub is the nicest which has large glossy pages. These come up on ebay for a about $125.00 and IMO it's well worth it. Second in line would be the big green book that has a picture of the flat head V-8 on the cover. ( i have no idea why). And then there are the smaller ones like the little yellow one by Dan Post. The information contained in the service bulletins goes over many of the mechanical super-sessions and also general repair information about the car.

                        The RG & JS "" Restoration Guide lines & Judging Standards""
                        These are available from one of the two national organizations MARC or MAFCA. If you have a driver or a points car this book is a must have. These show the correct assembly and parts for all the cars and the finishes etc..plus much more...These guidelines had multiple revisions which are included in the purchase along with a nice 3 ring binder. The guidelines have been compiled from years of research and effort by the gurus in the hobby and the information is nationally recognized.

                        The Les Andrews Mechanics handbook volume 1 (red) & volume 2 (green). Out of the two i feel the red one is more important but that is just my opinion. A word of caution about these is they were never revised regarding errors so be very careful of what you read into. One example is certain listed torque specs being way to high. I have the red one and it's a must have reference when doing mechanical work on these cars.

                        Official ""Paint & Refinish guide"" This book is also available from one of the national clubs and contains the actual colored paint chips. This book provides information regarding the proper color schemes etc..

                        This is a quick run down and others may have more recommendations...
                        3 ~ Tudor's
                        Henry Ford said
                        "It's all nuts and bolts"


                        Mitch's Auto Service ctr

                        Comment


                        • #15
                          Two more "must have" books are the owner's manual, and the Parts Price List. The PPL list all the chassis parts, and related nuts and bolts, etc.

                          Comment


                          • #16
                            A preamble to all of this would be to have a dry, rodent free, home for your baby to age more gracefully. IMO but not mandatory at all !!
                            Model A's and of course the famous AA's

                            Comment


                            • #17
                              Things to do once you purchased your new A

                              Well,
                              the thing to do is enjoy driving it all around the countryside as you look for a nice Studebaker to drive. LOL

                              Comment


                              • pAAt
                                pAAt commented
                                Editing a comment
                                or maybe a 49 F1 with a flat head 6 like my old days !

                            • #18
                              Here is what the lube chart looks like as mentioned in post #2. Some lube points take a few drops of oil such as the throttle linkage, generator etc ,etc..

                              23E97F38-F531-4E66-80D2-B6647E063B9FL0001.jpg
                              Attached Files
                              3 ~ Tudor's
                              Henry Ford said
                              "It's all nuts and bolts"


                              Mitch's Auto Service ctr

                              Comment


                              • CarlG
                                CarlG commented
                                Editing a comment
                                I have one of these hanging on the wall in my garage.

                              • Kevin84
                                Kevin84 commented
                                Editing a comment
                                Mitch, where can I get this lubrication chart?

                            • #19
                              That lube chart Mitch just pictured is great to hang on the garage wall. I bought a large wood frame at Goodwill for mine.

                              Comment


                              • Mitch
                                Mitch commented
                                Editing a comment
                                If anyone has a better clearer version of it please post it

                            • #20
                              In addition to photos, keep a log of everything you do on your A: When and where you bought it; who you bought it from; what the mileage reading was; what you replace; what you repair; what you adjust; what you spend; date and mileage when you do service; where you buy a part. Everything. And always note the date and mileage of when you do it. I started doing this about 11 years ago. This is especially helpful if you have more than one car; it's fun and interesting to look back after a couple years; and if and when you sell a car, the new owner will know what's been done, and you have a record to back up your claims.


                              IMG_7025.JPG

                              Comment


                              • CarlG
                                CarlG commented
                                Editing a comment
                                I started doing this when I got my new engine a couple years ago. Wish I had started it when I first got my truck 7 years ago.

                            • #21
                              Drive it a little every day. If you're afraid of breakdowns, drive it around the yard first. Then expand to around the block. Then venture out a few miles each day, and then 10 - 20 miles. Check over the car after each drive. After a month of that, you'll have confidence that your car can go many miles without breakdown. Eventually, you'll drive thousands of miles without care. Just keep up the regular maintenance so it stays reliable.
                              Ray White
                              - 1929 Sport Coupe
                              - 1929 Closed Cab Pickup

                              Model A Technical Trivial Quizzes:
                              http://sthosted.com/judging/index.html

                              Comment


                              • #22
                                Originally posted by Ray Horton View Post
                                In addition to photos, keep a log of everything you do on your A: When and where you bought it; who you bought it from; what the mileage reading was; what you replace; what you repair; what you adjust; what you spend; date and mileage when you do service; where you buy a part. Everything. And always note the date and mileage of when you do it. I started doing this about 11 years ago. This is especially helpful if you have more than one car; it's fun and interesting to look back after a couple years; and if and when you sell a car, the new owner will know what's been done, and you have a record to back up your claims.


                                IMG_7025.JPG
                                Great book, our club publishes a book almost the same which is great for keeping records

                                Comment


                                • #23
                                  What else can I say....

                                  Comment


                                  • #24
                                    Here is a check sheet I created that works as: "to do after purchase" and before or after the driving season. I included a .pdf to print and share. (once again if it is missing something let me know)
                                    1. Join a local club.
                                    2. When looking at a vehicle bring along someone who is knowledgeable.
                                    3. Do not buy the first car you see there are many good deals out there
                                    4. Decide on what you want a show car or a good daily driver
                                    5. Decide what year you want. The 1928-29’s look more antique and the 1930-31’s look more sleek.
                                    6. Decide what body style: Trucks are nice for hauling- Sedans are good for going out with friends- Roadsters and phaetons are nice when the weather is nice
                                    7. Become familiar with the value of a Model A. Search Ebay, Craigslist and Hemmings
                                    8. Don’t buy a “basket case”. Restored cars are less expensive in the long run.
                                    9. Look at the car in the daylight. Do not be fooled by a nice paint job.
                                    10. Most important of all, verify that the vehicle identification number (VIN) on the car matches the VIN number on the paperwork. If buying out of state know your states title process. Do this before you buy, the difficulty of the process can be a game changer.

                                    Under Hood
                                    • Ask if the engine bearings are Babbitt or inserts (Pros and Cons on both, worth noting)
                                    • Check the fan. If it is an original fan, look for fatigue cracks. (may be need to be replaced with a new aluminum)
                                    • Inspect the radiator for small leaks.
                                    • Check the water in the radiator, it should not be frothy.
                                    • Check the water pump for leak
                                    • Check the steering gear box for oil level (A tell on how well it is maintained)
                                    • Pull the dipstick and check the condition the oil. The oil should not be frothy.
                                    • Look at wiring it should be simple and straightforward, fancy gadgets should not be attached to the firewall
                                    • Inspect where the head meets the engine block. Brown ooze indicates blown head gasket
                                    • Check exhaust pipe for oil and/or coolant
                                    • Use a screwdriver and/or stethoscope and listen for valve/tappet noise
                                    • When running check for oily/smokey exhaust
                                    • Check if engine number matches year of car

                                    Outside the Car
                                    • Proper paint scheme helps with resale
                                    • Look for door sag/alignment.
                                    • Correct body parts for the year and body type.
                                    • rotten sheet metal
                                    • Check the front fenders along the bead for patches
                                    • Look under the fender for patches and welded cracks
                                    • When the doors are shut the handles on the outside should be level
                                    • Check for even wear on tires

                                    Under the Car:
                                    • Frame condition: Bent, Sagging, Cracks, Reinforcements Welds, Heavily Pitted and/or Corroded
                                    • Wheels: Bent, Pitted, Missing and/or Bent Spokes
                                    • Transmission and rear end: (Small leaks are permissible on transmission)
                                    • Check gearbox oil level (A tell on how well it is maintained)
                                    • Check that it has all four shocks, filled with fluid and working (Expensive to replace)
                                    • Jack the front of the car up, grab the front wheels at the tops and push/pull laterally back and forth to check the spindles.
                                    • Check looseness of pitman arm, drag link, and tie rod ball.
                                    • Look for bent brake rods
                                    • Look for dry joints where it should have been greased (A tell on how well it is maintained)
                                    • Look for oil running down the rear backing plates or drums
                                    • Look for incorrect bolts and missing cotter pins
                                    • Look for rusted out floor pans
                                    • If the seller allows, pull a brake drum or two to inspect
                                    • Inspect front and rear spring and perch bushings

                                    In the Car:
                                    • Check for gas leaks where the steering column and petcock are riveted to the gas tank (You will see brown stains)
                                    • Windshield should open and close
                                    • Windows should open and close
                                    • Bump the door lightly to make sure it remains shut
                                    • Inspect the interior rips, tears and or improper or missing screws

                                    Test Drive:
                                    • Start the Model A it should start easily
                                    • Move the spark advance lever all the way up and all the way down, you should notice a difference in the sound of the engine
                                    • Close the GAV and the engine should want to starve for gas
                                    • Check to see if the generator is charging
                                    • Check all lights
                                    • Check to make sure the horn works
                                    • Check operation of windshield wiper
                                    • Check gas gauge to make sure it works
                                    • The clutch should have about 1 inch of play before engaging
                                    • The clutch should not chatter when engaged
                                    • Before moving any distance, check to make sure you have brakes
                                    • Bring the vehicle up to speed and check your stopping distance. It should stop smoothly and in a straight line
                                    • The steering should not have more than 2 inch play
                                    • The Model A should steer easily and not shimmy
                                    • The vehicle should run smooth/strong and relatively quiet
                                    • Whine the engine out between shifts and listen for excessive gear noise
                                    • The transmission should never pop out of gear. Test: going uphill, downhill and over a bump
                                    • When traveling over a bump the A should not pull, jump or shimmy
                                    • Take it up a long hill to see if it boils over.
                                    • A stock/restored Model A will easily do 55 mph and ride very close to a normal car.
                                    • After test ride and being parked, there should not be more than a quarter coin sized puddle under the flywheel housing.



                                    Attached Files
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                                    • #25
                                      Kevin84 commented
                                      Today, 02:13 AM
                                      Mitch, where can I get this lubrication chart?
                                      Kevin most of the suppliers sell them
                                      3 ~ Tudor's
                                      Henry Ford said
                                      "It's all nuts and bolts"


                                      Mitch's Auto Service ctr

                                      Comment

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                                        "Again please respond in posts not messages for easier copying to the tech area later"

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