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  • Thermostats

    I did a search but did not find an answer. It is already hitting mid 80's here and mid 90's are just around the corner. So my question is why should I not remove my thermostat? Even when it opens it is very restrictive. If its purpose is to allow the engine to warm up faster then I don't need it in the summer. I have a problem with vapor lock when we tour in the mountains and the thermostat is not helping. Some people drill holes in it but that seems counter productive. Need advice thanks

  • #2
    A thermostat is designed to keep the coolant at a constant temperature.I run a 160 degree thermostat year around here in Pa.Summer temperatures can very well get into the 90's with high humidity.My model A has never had a problem overheating.I believe if things are set up properly there should be no overheating issues.

    As for the vapor lock.I add 4oz. of Marvel Mystery Oil to each full tank of gas and have not had a vapor lock since doing that 4yrs ago.Make sure your gas line to the carb has no flat area,meaning the line is all down hill to the carb as that is where the gas will vaporize.Hope this helps carlinamudwalker.

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    • #3
      The two small 1/8" holes drilled into the thermostat is just to make sure a tiny bit of hot coolant reaches the wax pellet to open the thermostat. The thermostat helps the engine warm up faster, and helps it maintain a good operating temperature. I use a 180 stat in my 28, and haven't had vapor lock problems since using only the better gas without corn crap, and I also add 4 ounces of MMO to each 10 gallons.

      Later I will try adding a quart of diesel to each tank of gas in my Studebaker, as some have reported success doing this.

      Comment


      • BILL WILLIAMSON
        BILL WILLIAMSON commented
        Editing a comment
        STONE COLD Engine, 160 thermostat, start it & rev up a little & you'll be amazed how much water comes into upper tank!! Some from the dingle valve & "maybe" some from an imperfect valve sealing??? You don't need NO BY-PASSES, EXTRA HOLES, ETC. IF you bought a 180 & wish you would have gotten a 160, only THEN, drill a couple of 1/8" holes.
        Everybody overthinks & over complicates, just plopping in a thermostat. Even buying a $97.00 "SPECIAL" HOUSING!
        Listen to Ol' Bill, been doin' this stuff for EONS & I'd NEVER steer you WRONG!! I only ever recommend stuff that has worked for ME, PERSONALLY!!
        The Dog "sed"--"I'd give you a THUMBS UP,'ceptin' I ain't got NO THUMBS"!!!
        Bill AKA Dad
        Last edited by BILL WILLIAMSON; 05-18-2018, 05:36 PM. Reason: FOOLISHNESS

    • #4
      You probably can take the stat out if you want to. If I lived in FL I don't think I would run one..If the engine runs much cooler than 160 fully warmed I prob would keep it in at that point. I guess it depends on many variables:

      Climate, engine and rad condition, timing, air flow, engine pans, type of oil, tire pressure, if the car is waxed and glides through the air stream.. lol
      2 1930 Tudors

      Henry Ford said
      "It's all nuts and bolts"


      Mitch's Auto Service ctr

      Comment


      • carolinamudwalker
        carolinamudwalker commented
        Editing a comment
        I will try only driving downhill and put an extra coat of wax on her under side

    • #5
      I've posted this before: Minerva had a Suppliers' 160 Degree sleeved thermostat in the upper end of the upper hose & it worked PERFECT, year around.
      Once did 39 Miles, running errands in town, on a 112 Degree day & she didn't even dribble when I got back! My charcoal seat back showed my COMPLETE SILHOUETTE!!!---She also had a WALKER, 10 Fin per Inch, radiator, which got a backflushing, once or twice a year.
      Dad Sweatinglikeapig
      Last edited by BILL WILLIAMSON; 05-17-2018, 04:56 PM.

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      • #6
        I will once again post my findings. I do not use a stat, but I did restrict the flow of coolant from the bottom of the radiator. I think Ford was right in changing from 2" input to 1¾" outlet. I believe this was done to slow the coolant down so the radiator had the chance to cool it off. I personally know that I have a 20º difference between exiting the engine and returning to the engine by using a 1¾" OD washer with a 1" hole soldered to the lower pipe. The stat is used in later model cars to restrict the coolant for a fast getting the engine up to the temperature to burn off all the excess crap that pollutes the air. Since we are gross polluters, it is not needed, the engine will get up to temp quick enough all by itself.

        Clean the radiator, keep it clean, if you must, restrict the flow OUT of the radiator, not into it, you can't cool what isn't there.
        VFF Recruiter

        YOU JUST CAN'T FIX STUPID!!

        "Individual Results May Vary"

        Comment


        • carolinamudwalker
          carolinamudwalker commented
          Editing a comment
          Now that is clear enough even for me to understand. Did you do before and after comparisons? My system is drained right now so I will look into what you have done. Shame that lower hose is to short to put in a ball valve. Thanks Wiz
          Last edited by carolinamudwalker; 05-17-2018, 01:18 PM.

        • DaWizard
          DaWizard commented
          Editing a comment
          There is a thread somewhere here where I went one step further. I placed a butterfly valve in the lower steel pipe and while out on our club trip to Desert Hot Springs adjusted the amount of restriction on the trip to see if I could get more cooling with holding the coolant in the radiator longer. I could not, short of closing off the exiting of coolant. So I went back to the washer in the outlet and am currently running that. I do not use antifreeze, I use plain tap water with machinist water soluble oil, or you can call it "water wetter" but instead of $6.00+ per 6oz, I pay $21.00/gal. Same stuff, different name.

      • #7
        I haven't had my 29 during the heat of summer here where it can reach 100+ for days, sometime weeks (but its a dry heat). With temps in the 80s after a 15 min drive my infrared thermometer registers head temps from 135 to 155. I have and plan to install a Vintage Precision thermostat housing and a temp gauge. When that finally happens I will submit a full report.

        Comment


        • carolinamudwalker
          carolinamudwalker commented
          Editing a comment
          Ok I think the condenses is to keep engine temp at about 160 to 180. my problem is if my engine is at 180 when I reach the foot of those mountains then it is going to over heat before reaching the top. I have the Vintage housing so popping the t-stat back in is no problem.

        • DaWizard
          DaWizard commented
          Editing a comment
          A stat is restricting the flow from the engine. How can the radiator cool the coolant if it is being restricted from the engine? Unless you are driving in cold winter conditions, I see no reason to use a stat. If your engine is overheating climbing a hill, you may not be running the spark correctly, or your radiator is dirty. I will be cleaning my radiator next week while it is off and I have the engine out, not because I need to, but because it can't hurt and I want to. After using the in-hose filter, I even glued magnets in the inlet neck of the radiator, I believe the older the engine gets, the more the cast iron will continue to flake off. I am doing everything I can think of to keep the engine running cool, it seems to me when it is cool it runs peppier, and I like that.

      • #8
        A thermostat has nothing to do with vapor lock the heat of of you exhaust does especially if you drive then stop shut the car off the heat is still there which is why I wrapped my exhaust pipe and I never had any issue even in july in kansas at 100 degrees.

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        • #9
          I use a thermostat. Not just to warm the engine on cold days, but to slow down the flow of coolant. The modern radiators have much thinner, flatter tubes, which carry less coolant than originals. They may have the same number of tubes, but the tubes are smaller. At highway speeds, this can cause the coolant to go down the overflow tube, as the pump may be pumping more coolant than the radiator can flow. I use a brassworks radiator, but even those have smaller tubes than originals. Your car may be different, so the results may vary. I dont say you should use one, I just say that is why I use one.
          Bill
          http://www.brauchauto.com/

          Comment


          • #10
            Originally posted by 2manycars View Post
            I use a thermostat. Not just to warm the engine on cold days, but to slow down the flow of coolant. The modern radiators have much thinner, flatter tubes, which carry less coolant than originals. They may have the same number of tubes, but the tubes are smaller. At highway speeds, this can cause the coolant to go down the overflow tube, as the pump may be pumping more coolant than the radiator can flow. I use a brassworks radiator, but even those have smaller tubes than originals. Your car may be different, so the results may vary. I dont say you should use one, I just say that is why I use one.
            That's exactly why I first installed one.
            The added benefit is the quicker warm up, plus it will supply the needed restriction to send hot coolant through my heater core.

            Because the thermostat is in my upper hose, it's some distance from the top of the head, and I feel the hot coolant will reach it better if I have two 1/8" holes in stat.

            Comment


            • BILL WILLIAMSON
              BILL WILLIAMSON commented
              Editing a comment
              Here we go, drillin' HOLES, AGAIN!
              Why not leave it alone & let it work as it was DESIGNED to work???
              Dad Flusteredagain!
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