Announcement

Collapse

Welcome to the Model A Forums

General Discussion
See more
See less

This is my project, when i bought it. in 2007

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • This is my project, when i bought it. in 2007

    My 1929 Martin Parry 500A panel truck, when i first purchased it.

  • #2
    Project moving forward quicker

    About a month ago, i had my chassis pretty well completed, and that's the way it has been for quite a few years; i had a couple operations, and my wife had both hips replaced, and that's where the time goes. Anyway in the last month, i have added the cowl, splash shields, the radiator, shell, hood, hood shelves, the over cowl and windshield wood and the first base layer of body wood from the cowl back to the tail extension. So, here are some photos, I hope?

    Comment


    • JDupuis
      JDupuis commented
      Editing a comment
      Wow, excellent progress. Wishing you and your wife much better health. Jeff

    • pAAt
      pAAt commented
      Editing a comment
      Sunnyorm, you have a great start to that project !! Is that a wood kit or are you designing it yourself and is it a station wagon ? Pat

    • DaWizard
      DaWizard commented
      Editing a comment
      Sunny, that is some project you have there. Now that you know how to post pictures, I expect a LOT of pictures and regular updates.

    • Ken Parker
      Ken Parker commented
      Editing a comment
      I have the same questions as pAAt. I have started my Special Delivery Woodie and your pictures answer some questions and generate other questions. Thanks for posting them. kenp

    • Ray Horton
      Ray Horton commented
      Editing a comment
      I have a lot of respect and admiration for excellent woodworking.

  • #3
    I know what it is now

    Comment


    • #4
      Thanks Jeff, we are definitely in better health now.

      Comment


      • #5
        Pat, i am constructing all the wood myself, because what i inherited when first purchased, was a nightmare, as far as the wood is concerned. i will be posting more photos of this nightmare, to give a better idea. my first model a mentor, when he saw it, was "i think you got taken" haha

        Comment


        • #6
          You have a hell of a job, ahead of you, to prove him wrong You've got a great start and some wood working tools I see there. Will be waiting to see your updated pictures. Pat

          Comment


          • #7
            Your perseverance will pay off. Although your patience may be tried.
            You can eat an elephant.....one bite at a time. Jeff

            Comment


            • #8
              Sunny
              That is a rare and very unique body. I guess you are an expert wood worker? and if your not you will be..
              2 1930 Tudors

              Henry Ford said
              "It's all nuts and bolts"


              Mitch's Auto Service ctr

              Comment


              • sunnyorm
                sunnyorm commented
                Editing a comment
                Why yes Mitch, i am uh, expert in woodworking, uh, but please don't pass that around too much, i'd hate to think i would end up with more misscuts on someone else's rig.

            • #9
              I just keep posting photos, as i progress, i have made some good contacts with other Martin Parry owners who, while they don't have the identical truck as mine, they have been able to supply me with they're wood structures, which helped alot, to visualize mine. Also was able thru a very gracious person, to acquire a copy of an original advertising booklet, which had info. on how they were manufactured.Let me know if I can help, with more than photos.
              Last edited by sunnyorm; 05-24-2018, 12:43 PM. Reason: grammer natzi personality (mine)

              Comment


              • #10
                Was it running when they parked it?

                Comment


                • sunnyorm
                  sunnyorm commented
                  Editing a comment
                  not to my knowledge

              • #11
                Thanks to Mitch, for the magic in combining my 2 project posts!

                Comment


                • pAAt
                  pAAt commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I was wondering how that happened

              • #12
                More photos added: after gluing and screwing wood rails to wood crossmembers, I flipped the entire base frame assembly over, and added 1" x 7" rail overlay pieces on top of base rails.

                Comment


                • Bobm90
                  Bobm90 commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Rarely am I speechless all I can say here is WOW !! Great work, good luck.

              • #13
                Beautiful.

                Comment


                • sunnyorm
                  sunnyorm commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Thanks Ray

              • #14
                I have decided to update using a "before and after" sequencing; i.e. posting original area photos, then new area photos. Here i have determined that, before moving forward anymore, i need to solidly anchor cowl uprights to base with metal plates and straps, which i decided these are within my skill set. the photos here show the plate which anchors the base to the cowl to chassis frame bolts, and the strap which secures the aft floor under feet panel, to the outside base rails.

                Comment


                • Mitch
                  Mitch commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I wish you were closer. You have a very interesting project going on. I could maybe take over the night shift
                  Thanks for the pics

              • #15
                Don’t know if you remember, we talked about that truck on the other place when you were buying. I had been watching that one too. I love it, will make a killer truck when done. I’m glad you’re posting here. Long live the wood bodies trucks!

                Comment


                • sunnyorm
                  sunnyorm commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Thanks, and i do have a vague memory, which, for me is saying something to remember yesterday.

              • #16
                Anytime, Mitch, the night shift is definitely open, pay is terrible though.

                Comment


                • #17
                  Looking good! Keep the pics coming.

                  Comment


                  • #18
                    Super nice job, you must have the patience of a priest. I hope to work on my A this summer, my problem is summer's are way too short and winters are horribly long.

                    Comment


                    • DaWizard
                      DaWizard commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Hey Ed, probably time to invest in a heated garage to kill those winter woes. I can't say I know how you feel back there, but I do know what it is like to not be able to drive or work on the car.

                    • Ed H
                      Ed H commented
                      Editing a comment
                      I did pick up a mobile home furnace a Miller upright. If things go as planned I should have it hooked up and running by fall. Maybe I can get out there and putter with the ole gal this winter.

                    • DaWizard
                      DaWizard commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Oh great, sounds like you just might get that winter work done so you can have it out in the spring.

                  • #19
                    Your 'before' photos look like fallen western ghost towns that I like to explore. Wood is not my thing...its too hard! Like Dirty Harry said, "A mans got to know his limitations", and I do.
                     

                    Comment


                    • sunnyorm
                      sunnyorm commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Thanks!

                  • #20
                    Well, my plans to get the metal plates and flat stock pieces for bolting the cowl/windshield wood posts to the frame,has been shifted, because to get the correct metal, entails a trip to Bakersfield (35 mi. west), our town, sometimes is limited for specialty items. So, I decided to go back to the cowl/windshield uprights, and glue and screw them up, finished that, so decided to form outsides of the wood posts to receive sheet metal overlays.
                    started belt sander to round-off posts, and, yup, Murphey was there; belt sander died on me. Tried different outlets, twisted cord checking for shorted wire, nope, so decided to leave it overnight, and check it next day, still dead. I bought that Hitachi belt sander in 1980, it survived 2 businesses, plus around the house stuff for 38 years, R.I.P. So went over to Home Depot, and bought a replacement. haven't gotten back to the finish sanding on the posts, as the photos will show, just rough planed it to get it to what the photos show.

                    Comment


                    • #21
                      Very nice work so far sunnyorm.

                      I have to agree with you, Hitachi makes(maybe now made) great tools back then.

                      I have a 9 inch angle grinder that has had an absolute hiding.

                      Been left out in the rain, dropped off roofs, ran on 1000 watt generators where it spooled up slowly to revs.

                      Made bad noises, pulled apart and bevel gears greased, had the plastic trigger break, now has a piece of wood and plastic tie for a trigger and still going strong .

                      I bought it about 1980 too.

                      Comment


                      • #22
                        Update: Tried to explain assembly, but hope photos will clear up the words.

                        Order of assembly:
                        1. install windshield / cowl posts
                        2. install 1 screw on each side of gastank into underside of windshield frame wood, to eliminate frame moving forward or backward.
                        3. Drill and attachflat stock metal from under feet floorboard edge piece to foreward most wooden baserails.
                        4. Lay in cowl to frame sheet metal plates.
                        5. Establish square of windshield posts to wood baserails.
                        6. Temporarily clamp entire baseframe for later permanent anchoring.
                        7. Place frog green tape at wooden crossmembers of baseframe and chassis frame members for future crossreferencing.
                        8. Place fit passenger front door.

                        Comment


                        • #23
                          My original Model A mentor, who thankfully is still kicking at 83 or 84, said when you start putting things together, you find more things start fitting together in the overall construction, how right he is. Here are some kneejerk photos of the the sheetmetal side panels laid out on the shop floor.

                          The sheetmetal layout on the floor is viewing as though from inside the driver's side.

                          The wood framed structure hold's the small window, which is behind the driver's door, and double's as the upright wood for receiving the front door as it close's, and latches shut.
                          Attached Files

                          Comment


                          • #24
                            When I was restoring a English car, I needed to replace all floor panels and a few other structural areas of the "creature from hell". Although I live in a area that has suppliers of sheet metal and alike, I bought my needed materials on line, not just for cost but also for their large selection of available materials and services available, rather than make a 35 mile trip when you need materials you may want to give these guys a look - naturally as with any mail order if you can make a list of all you may need and combine it into one shipment it will be cheaper and more convenient. http://www.metalsdepot.com/?gclid=EA...SAAEgIZmfD_BwE
                            Their deliveries were fast and reasonable and the UPS guy got a good work out. LOL

                            Comment


                            • sunnyorm
                              sunnyorm commented
                              Editing a comment
                              Thanks Bobm90, will keep that in mind, and bookmark.

                            • sunnyorm
                              sunnyorm commented
                              Editing a comment
                              Just ordered from them, i'm going to attempt making my front door hinges, as my truck only had 2 of the 6 total, when i got it.

                          • #25
                            Decided to start on the front door wood, so chose the doorlatch mechanism upright. 1 door is pretty much been fitted to latch mechanism, and i must say it went rather well.

                            Photos show old wood next to new wood, and the door latch mechanism fit of 1 side.

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X