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  • I could use some tips for my next project

    When the weather allows I am going to try to replace my wishbone with one I have found that has a good ball on it. I know the spring perches are going to present a struggle. If you have a method that works for getting those boogers out, I’d appreciate your wisdom.

  • #2
    Ray, Beauford knows all about perches, and to this day I consider them problematic. I would be ready to use an O/A torch to heat things up, knowing you are gonna end up there anyway.

    We do a lot of welding here. For steering balls, I just weld them up and grind them down. We are welding on forged parts here, they can take the welding very nicely.
    Tom W had a trick of using a washer with a 1" ID to act as a gauge block when grinding down the steering balls, and boy what a slick idea. I also do that with the 1/2" ball on the end of the shifter

    You could do the same with your wishbone ball, and a washer with the correct hole size, which right now I do not know what that is. It would be infinitely easier than taking everything apart. Or bring it by, and I'll have it welded and ground for you in an hr

    good luck, Dave
    Last edited by tbirdtbird; 02-07-2018, 08:15 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      I wish I could bring it by! But I think I’m just gonna have to do it the hard way.

      Comment


      • #4
        I agree with Dave, just find a washer with a 1 1/2" hole, then weld and grind, or file away the excess weld.

        Comment


        • #5
          Start putting the penetrating oil (your choice of brand) to the perches. Keep them soaked till spring, when you're ready to start the job. Jeff
          Twiss Collector Car Parts

          Comment


          • #6
            I tap the perches up and out still connected to the spring and shackles. With the nut loose but still on the perch hit them out using a heavy duty pointed drift. Once they start moving and there is not much thread left remove the nut and tap them all the way out. When reinstalling grease everything up and the perches will tap right back into place. Of course if they don't move a little heat may be necessary for removal. They have a little bit of pressure from the spring but it's not that much.
            I just did this the other day
            3~ Tudor's & 1~ Coupe
            Henry Ford said,
            "It's all nuts and bolts"
            "Start by doing what's necessary; then do what's possible; and suddenly you are doing the impossible."

            Mitch's Auto Service ctr

            Comment


            • #7
              Mitch, you make it sound easy.
              i have found perches to be anything but.
              Because of the taper, they pound into the axle and seemingly become permanently wed to it, no divorce allowed!

              You must be doing something we are not doing. Maybe something you don't even realize you are doing?

              Comment


              • Mitch
                Mitch commented
                Editing a comment
                Let's put it this way. Once they move tap, tap tap. If your working on a rust bucket then heat is your friend. Ill post a pic tomorrow of my special drift tool.

              • BNCHIEF
                BNCHIEF commented
                Editing a comment
                My experience with A's has been like t-birds

              • Guest's Avatar
                Guest commented
                Editing a comment
                I'm not understanding your comment. The taper on the perch does not have anything to do with the axle, and cannot "pound into" it. The taper contacts the wishbone. The axle has straight smooth bore.

                I have disassembled 8 or 10 original front ends and not encountered a stuck perch, though I know others have. You won't know what you are facing until you try.

            • #8
              Without delay here is the promised special perch tool pic
              It’s bigger and beefier than it looks

              B9DA749B-DC5E-403A-954E-50439A3C03F7.jpeg
              3~ Tudor's & 1~ Coupe
              Henry Ford said,
              "It's all nuts and bolts"
              "Start by doing what's necessary; then do what's possible; and suddenly you are doing the impossible."

              Mitch's Auto Service ctr

              Comment


              • #9
                are you pounding UP while the wishbone is in the car,
                or DOWN with the wishbone out of the car

                Comment


                • Mitch
                  Mitch commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Up in the car attached

              • #10
                Exactly how you see it pictured is how I R&I the axle



                1BE078B7-E2AD-4503-A980-5F46CD5C2637.jpeg
                3~ Tudor's & 1~ Coupe
                Henry Ford said,
                "It's all nuts and bolts"
                "Start by doing what's necessary; then do what's possible; and suddenly you are doing the impossible."

                Mitch's Auto Service ctr

                Comment


                • Mitch
                  Mitch commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Left the shackles connected to the spring and perches. Put the perches in one at a time. Tap Tap... This is also a new spring FYI

                • Mickey
                  Mickey commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Wow, that is one good looking A!

              • #11
                Thank you! Very helpful so far, gentlemen. I suspect I’ll be using all suggestions. What are the large and small diameters on your punch, Mitch?

                Comment


                • #12
                  I do not understand why they come out easier that way than pressing them, what do I not understand about your method Mitch, mine were not rusted so much but they were still a bear.

                  Comment


                  • #13
                    I will pass on what Rainmaker Ron's advice from several years ago that he posted on Ahooga chat room.

                    Use a knockoff style hub puller with a ball bearing inside. This will transfer the force to the end of the perch instead of the threads and reduce the chance of mushrooming the end of the perch and allow for use of a bigger hammer. Rod
                    "Much of the social history of the Western world, over the past three decades, has been a history of replacing what worked with what sounded good." Thomas Sowell

                    Comment


                    • #14
                      So you have a tough one? Try this!!!

                      BC52DF63-A14F-4B0C-B7AF-3A827C85A61D.jpeg5E70D982-ED7A-4ABC-B30A-205803C335F6.jpeg
                      3~ Tudor's & 1~ Coupe
                      Henry Ford said,
                      "It's all nuts and bolts"
                      "Start by doing what's necessary; then do what's possible; and suddenly you are doing the impossible."

                      Mitch's Auto Service ctr

                      Comment


                      • George Miller
                        George Miller commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Mitch that is a nice puller

                      • BNCHIEF
                        BNCHIEF commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Great idea Mitch rod also had a great tip as well, there really is more than one way to do this.

                    • #15
                      George
                      It’s part of a larger kit

                      A32CADD1-CCB0-49CF-AF4B-855896E42203.jpeg
                      3~ Tudor's & 1~ Coupe
                      Henry Ford said,
                      "It's all nuts and bolts"
                      "Start by doing what's necessary; then do what's possible; and suddenly you are doing the impossible."

                      Mitch's Auto Service ctr

                      Comment


                      • aford193031
                        aford193031 commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Better have good bearings on that tool drawer and well greased

                      • tbirdtbird
                        tbirdtbird commented
                        Editing a comment
                        sigh, some people have all the good tools.......

                    • #16
                      That, some hot air, tap the end of the puller as you apply pressure. Always worked for me.
                      I had a king pin I had to put a chain around the axle, used a 20 ton bottle jack, and heat. It came out not damage.

                      Comment


                      • #17
                        Mitch, after looking at your pictures of your puller and then looking at my axle, It doesn’t appear to me there is enough surface there to grip. It looks like the bar will just slip off the axle. Especially if you are whacking the puller at the same time. And yet you say this works. What is the secret?

                        Comment


                        • Mitch
                          Mitch commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Ray
                          Set the claws at 10:00 & 4:00 onto the axle. If you look at my pic carefully you’ll see the claws are not directly across but caddy corner. This will give you plenty to grip. Then tighten the bar between the jaws on the puller and it can’t slip off.

                      • #18
                        Originally posted by Rowdy View Post
                        I will pass on what Rainmaker Ron's advice from several years ago that he posted on Ahooga chat room.

                        Use a knockoff style hub puller with a ball bearing inside. This will transfer the force to the end of the perch instead of the threads and reduce the chance of mushrooming the end of the perch and allow for use of a bigger hammer. Rod
                        yup he taught me that too - also once it starts moving a bit he usually finished up with a air hammer in the end of the perch to vibrate it out. He did have 1 that heat hammers pushers air hammers would not budge.

                        Comment


                        • #19
                          I would love to see a pic of that particular setup......I am having trouble visualizing it. You mean the type of puller used to remove a rear drum? If so how/ what do you attach to on the axle

                          Comment


                          • #20
                            Maybe they mean a hub knocker

                            You do not have permission to view this gallery.
                            This gallery has 1 photos.
                            3~ Tudor's & 1~ Coupe
                            Henry Ford said,
                            "It's all nuts and bolts"
                            "Start by doing what's necessary; then do what's possible; and suddenly you are doing the impossible."

                            Mitch's Auto Service ctr

                            Comment


                            • BNCHIEF
                              BNCHIEF commented
                              Editing a comment
                              They make a plain screw on piece that is nothing more than a piece of octagon shaped steel threaded to the axle size. Go to Macs search for model t axle hub knocker it is about 5.00 i tried to get a picture but could not.
                              Last edited by BNCHIEF; 02-09-2018, 06:53 AM.

                          • #21
                            I consider my self lucky! I've pulled the perches off all three of my cars and all three came out with out much trouble. However that is not always the case. This is a "Hail Mary" pass type of resolution, but loosen the nut a little, saturate it with oil and drive it around a little. However, before you do all this, make sure that it is as tight as you are afraid it might be. Maybe you'll luck out and it won't be a problem. And make sure when you put it back, you generously coat the parts with "Neverseize".
                            Terry

                            Comment


                            • #22
                              I have a few different size axle knockers, but haven't used them yet. I've used my Snap On hub puller with success.

                              To use the axle knocker, if you want to loosen the left hub, then leave that tire on the ground, jack the other rear tire an inch off the ground, and hit the knocker.
                              This means you'd have to remove a hub cap, or save a newer rim and tire to mount in place of the original.

                              Comment


                              • #23
                                First off, NEVER NEVER heat the axle past about 300 degrees EVER. That just makes it way softer. Ya I know there is a group of you who say so what, well you can drive your cars how you want. I did some axle straightening and found the heated axles way to soft for my tastes, but I seem to have higher standards.

                                That being said. I accidentally bought a long throw (about 3") automotive air hammer when I bought a pile of tools at a garage sale cheap. I did not realize what I had bought.

                                I had an axle where the perches were not moving at all. I tried big pullers, 10 ton press, twisting with no luck. I got out the long throw and cut the end off a chisel. I mounted the axle in my very large vice (this is important). Put a nut on the end of the perch and started at it with the air hammer. Took a bit of time, but the perch started moving- VERY slowly at first. Eventually, it came out fighting all the way. Amazingly the end had a slight mushroom but the nut still fit on it!!

                                You have to understand about my vice. It is over 100lbs. If you do not have the item your are trying to beat something out of firmly mounted, every little movement of the item you are beating will take away from the force making the part move. You MUST have a solid zero movement holder for any beatings to work well.

                                There are 2 common types of air hammers. There is the X series. These have their length denoted by the number of X's. These are designed for aircraft rivet setting. They need to give a uniform hit as the hammer you use is determined by the size of the rivet you are setting. The automotive units vary and tend to have a larger (5/8" vs 1/2") diameter piston. There are also variations on hits per second. Either will work, I just happen to have a couple of automotive units. They are also expensive if the guy knows what he has, but I have bought them for less the $10.

                                If you link to my site below you will find how I measured the axles for straightening them.

                                Comment


                                • #24
                                  don't see a link

                                  Comment


                                  • #25
                                    After much reading, talking to other A guys, and considering all of the comments here, I have decided to follow Tom and Dave’s advice and weld and grind and check fit with a 1-1/2” ID washer. I’ll examine the rest of the axle components while I’ve got the assembly out of the car, just to make sure. It’s been about 15,000 miles since it was gone through.

                                    Thanks to all who contributed their knowledge and suggestions.

                                    Comment

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