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The Old Motor Picture Thread

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  • The Old Motor Picture Thread

    Picture #1

    In the garage: Damaged Model A Sport Coupe!




    Today’s feature image taken in 1933 contains a 1930 Model “A” Sport Coupe in the Granada Garage, located at 452 South Western Avenue in Wilshire Center just west of Los Angeles. Photos like this were, and still are today taken by insurance companies to document the damage sustained in an accident.

    It appears the Garage was a full-service facility with specialties that included engine rebuilding and body and paintwork. Portable electric welding jobs were done with the Shop’s 1928-’29 Model “A” Ford pickup truck visible in the expandable photos below. The welder was powered by a generator visible behind the front bumper, which was driven off of the crankshaft by a power take off unit that could be engaged and disengaged by a hand lever behind it.

    Tell us what you find of interest in these photographs courtesy of the USC Libraries.







    2 1930 Tudors

    Henry Ford said
    "It's all nuts and bolts"


    Mitch's Auto Service ctr

  • #2
    Great pix, but it hurts to look at them......

    Comment


    • #3
      The one sign says Bear Wheel Alignment.. I wonder if it's a shower rod. lol

      It looks like the hit missed the cowl and quarter.
      2 1930 Tudors

      Henry Ford said
      "It's all nuts and bolts"


      Mitch's Auto Service ctr

      Comment


      • #4
        Assume the car was repaired using some new fenders, etc. as the body appears very straight. Can't tell about the chassis condition, however..
        What's inside the car on the seat, perhaps interior door panel?

        Comment


        • tbirdtbird
          tbirdtbird commented
          Editing a comment
          good eye

      • #5
        The front bumper looks pretty flat, except for the bent left end.
        Surprised to see the headliner hanging down in the one car. Thought that only happened after 20 years or so.

        Comment


        • #6
          On the last picture, left side, looks like a Whippet next to a very early (maybe open bumper) '28 Ford.
          "We do not stop playing because we grow old;
          We grow old because we stop playing ...
          NEVER Be The First To Get Old!" Pilfered from the MAFC SA Newsletter

          I JUST CAN'T FIX STUPID!!

          Comment


          • DaWizard
            DaWizard commented
            Editing a comment
            After closer inspection, not an open bumper '28. But that is a Whippet next to that roadster.

        • #7
          A reply regarding the photos!!!!




          EDWIN HAYSLIP ·January 25, 2018 at 2:14 pm
          The car at the left in the first photo is a Graham-Paige circa 1930. The 3 window coupe with the covered trunk is a Chevrolet. The Model A pickup truck is a 1930. The Jan-June Ford trucks look like the 1929s. This has 1930 headlights which were gradually fitted to trucks as the old ones were used up from stock. The gas cap looks like a 1/4 twist which was a running change on trucks in early 1930.
          2 1930 Tudors

          Henry Ford said
          "It's all nuts and bolts"


          Mitch's Auto Service ctr

          Comment


          • #8
            Your right Wiz . Here is another reply

            ROBERT D. CUNNINGHAM ·January 25, 2018 at 11:11 am
            The bottom photo provides an interesting side-by-side comparison of the Ford and Whippet roadsters against the back wall. Until Willys-Overland debuted the Whippet for 1927, Ford had been the smallest car on the American market. It was developed to fit a niche that the automotive press called the “Pony Four” class — smaller than a Ford with an emphasis on acceleration and braking. The 32-HP Cavalier was the first car produced to fit the Pony Four niche, but it failed to get beyond the prototype stage. Whippet was the second Pony Four, and Willys sold more than 110,000 the first year.
            2 1930 Tudors

            Henry Ford said
            "It's all nuts and bolts"


            Mitch's Auto Service ctr

            Comment


            • #9
              Great thread. Is that an electric wiper on the Sport Coupe? I can't see for sure. If so, wouldn't it be a little late for that? I'll have to check my RG & JS.

              Comment


              • #10
                Picture #2

                Gas for Fifteen Cents a Gallon: Goodrich Tires Service Station!





                The B.F. Goodrich and Firestone tire companies began opening tire stores with combined service and lubrication facilities in large cities around the country in the late-1920s. Goodrich opened a number of new outlets in the Los Angeles, California area in the early-to-mid-1930s probably in an effort to retain its market share during the Great Depression.

                These staged promotional photos were taken by the Dick Whittington photo agency of a Goodrich service station on Elk Street in the Glendale neighborhood of Los Angeles (one of Wittington’s 1932 Ford Model “B” roadsters is used as a prop.) On the far-right-hand side of the image are a service area and next to it the lubrication facilities. The second photo below shows a Goodrich balloon tire on a special rim to suit it.

                Tell us what you find of interest in this circa 1934 photograph courtesy of the USC Libraries.









                2 1930 Tudors

                Henry Ford said
                "It's all nuts and bolts"


                Mitch's Auto Service ctr

                Comment


                • DaWizard
                  DaWizard commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Hey, we didn't need no stinkin funnel, we had a can with a drop down neck!!

                  How well I remember using those cans. Ah the memories. Folks also had enough sense to NOT fall into the pit!!

              • #11
                The outdoor service fluids coming out of the ground and the service pit, still found in many (up scale) homes from the 20's and 30's.

                Comment


                • #12
                  Thanks Mitch for posting these pics, I sure enjoy looking at them!

                  That '32 Model B Roadster was in a book on the Early V-8's I saw years ago taken from a different angle. Neat car.

                  Looking at that Sport Coupe that got clipped------ I sure hope Vintique parts weren't called in for repairs like how insurance companies today want to slap Taiwan junk on your daily driver that has had an accident instead of genuine factory parts!!

                  Comment


                  • #13
                    Picture #3

                    Scrub-A-Dub-Model T In A Tub.





                    In the late 1920s the Neway Auto Wash Bowl was built in Chicago in 1924 by The Newway Auto Cleaning & Service Corp. The car was first run around in the pool of water to flush mud and dirt off of the undercarriage. It was then driven up into a stall and the car was washed in the normal matter to complete the job.



                    2 1930 Tudors

                    Henry Ford said
                    "It's all nuts and bolts"


                    Mitch's Auto Service ctr

                    Comment


                    • BNCHIEF
                      BNCHIEF commented
                      Editing a comment
                      1925 model t coupe can't tell for sure the other might be a dodge.

                    • BILL WILLIAMSON
                      BILL WILLIAMSON commented
                      Editing a comment
                      We cleaned ours down in the Creek Crossing!
                      Dad Muddy

                    • Larrys40
                      Larrys40 commented
                      Editing a comment
                      That is funny Guys ! Don’t think I’ve ever seen anything like that .
                      Larry

                  • #14
                    Picture #4

                    Model A Ford Assembly Line





                    A Press Photo taken in one of the Ford Motor Company plants during the 1931 model year run, which shows a commercial chassis in front of a whole batch of roadsters fol-lowing it down the line. Interestingly in the left hand background appear to be three more roadsters with their tops covered with paper to prevent soiling which you can also see on the assembly line. Also note that the cowl on the commercial chassis appears to be in primer to allow the painting of it to be completed by whoever completes it with a body.



                    2 1930 Tudors

                    Henry Ford said
                    "It's all nuts and bolts"


                    Mitch's Auto Service ctr

                    Comment


                    • DaWizard
                      DaWizard commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Is it me, or does that AA have a different tread for rear than front tires?

                    • Guest's Avatar
                      Guest commented
                      Editing a comment
                      The commercial chassis is RHD also.

                    • CM2
                      CM2 commented
                      Editing a comment
                      http://i64.tinypic.com/28ltnr6.jpg

                      Looks like Long Beach assembly

                    • Mitch
                      Mitch commented
                      Editing a comment
                      You can do BB codes?

                  • #15
                    Picture #5

                    On The Road




                    A family in Virginia during 1939 on the move in a Model A Ford two-door sedan. It appears that they have everything they own with them on the car or in the home-made trailer that is following them.
                    2 1930 Tudors

                    Henry Ford said
                    "It's all nuts and bolts"


                    Mitch's Auto Service ctr

                    Comment


                    • BNCHIEF
                      BNCHIEF commented
                      Editing a comment
                      That picture could be in oklahoma or kansas jsut from the landscape even tho you said virginia, model t wheels on the trailer

                  • #16
                    Route 66 in the Golden State – The Western End of the Fabled Highway



                    Route 66, the “Mother Road”, opened California up for both vacationers and travelers seeking a new life there. Running over old established trails that the earliest settlers blazed while heading west, Route 66 became the highway of dreams to “The Promised Land”. It crossed the desert, then entered the San Bernardino Valley and ended up at the famous pier in Santa Monica, overlooking the Pacific Ocean. The road became legendary, as did the Golden State, in oft repeated stories of sunny, warm weather and lack of rainfall in the land of palm trees.

                    It’s U.S. Route number was assigned by the American Association of State Highway Officials in late 1926 when the highway got it’s start and was accepted by the Automobile Club of Southern California in 1928. Seen above are a two hard working Route 66 sign inspectors assuring quality while living the easy life there in the late 1930’s.
                    2 1930 Tudors

                    Henry Ford said
                    "It's all nuts and bolts"


                    Mitch's Auto Service ctr

                    Comment


                    • BudP
                      BudP commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Drove Route 66 from Santa Monica Pier to downtown Chicago in 1959 with three other guys in a 1950 Ford. Crossing the desert we thoroughly watered bath towels, hung them in the windows and turned on the heater fan without heat to get some evaporative cooling: it worked until the towels dried.

                    • Mickey
                      Mickey commented
                      Editing a comment
                      I've got a feeling it was Route 66 whether the Automobile Club of Southern California accepted it or not.

                    • Bobm90
                      Bobm90 commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Now there's something to make a long drive worthwhile !!

                  • #17
                    A Model “A” Ford on Missouri Route 21 in Bonnie & Clyde Country



                    Route 21 is a highway in eastern Missouri that begins at Route 30 in Affton, just southwest of St. Louis and ends at the Arkansas state line. In the St. Louis area, it is known as Tesson Ferry Road, which was named after the 19th century proprietor of the ferry across the Meramec River. This great photo shows a 1931 Ford Model “A” Roadster motoring right along at a good clip, probably in Jefferson County, Missouri in the early 1930’s.

                    2 1930 Tudors

                    Henry Ford said
                    "It's all nuts and bolts"


                    Mitch's Auto Service ctr

                    Comment


                    • #18
                      Nice photos, mitch. The girls by the 66 sign are nice, but my photo of the girl with the 30 tudor and machine gun and huge headlamps is more fun.
                      Bill
                      http://www.brauchauto.com/
                      Eastern Connecticut

                      Comment


                      • Mitch
                        Mitch commented
                        Editing a comment
                        I remember that one, from the VFF party

                      • Mitch
                        Mitch commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Thanks

                      • Mitch
                        Mitch commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Notice the engine pans deflecting the dirt to the rear of the car. The carb is sucking nothing but clean fresh air

                    • #19
                      Putting on the Ritz – The Model A Ford Town Car Sedan Delivery

                      • Fordd1
                      • 1931 Ford Model A Town Car Sedan Delivery – Coachwork by Briggs.

                      Recently we posted a photo of an interesting M.C. Rogers Engineering Co. Model A Ford Sedan Delivery and were unsuccessful in learning who constructed its body. At some point years ago we found a reference that is not readily at hand to the many various different makers of Ford commercial and sedan delivery bodies; Ford at the time had many of its bodies produced by outside suppliers and we have now found an excellent online source you may find useful.

                      ftcdAfter a bit of searching, we were able to find a treasure trove of information on the subject of 1908 to 1941 Ford Commercial Bodies at Coachbuilt, one of the best online sources to be found on the subject of coachbuilders. There it was learned that this attractive and exclusive-looking body was introduced in 1930, and is called the Model A Ford Type 295-A Town Car Delivery; the builder was the Briggs Manufacturing Co. of Detroit, Michigan.

                      This pair of Town Car Sedan Deliveries were both photographed in the fall of 1931, quite late in the last year of production of the Model A Ford. Both images are courtesy of The Henry Ford.
                      • fordd2
                      • 1931 Ford Model A Town Car Sedan Delivery – Coachwork by Briggs.
                      2 1930 Tudors

                      Henry Ford said
                      "It's all nuts and bolts"


                      Mitch's Auto Service ctr

                      Comment


                      • #20
                        Auto-Repair-Shop-Los-Angeles-1930s-Cars-2-.jpgOne-Stop-Pennzoil-Lubrication-1930.jpg
                        2 1930 Tudors

                        Henry Ford said
                        "It's all nuts and bolts"


                        Mitch's Auto Service ctr

                        Comment


                        • #21
                          The Model “A” Ford Moving the Goods in Texas



                          Fal1

                          The Model “A” Ford was one of the most popular and durable cars of the time, and Henry Ford apparently did not waste any time to develop it into a sturdy light-duty truck. Ford did make a two door Sedan Delivery, but seen above are two 1928 or 1929 Ford Taxi Cabs, converted into light delivery vehicles with painted rear windows. The larger one bringing up the rear is a Model “AA” truck that appears to be wearing a school bus body; it also was converted to haul Falstaff Beer.

                          Fal2Fal3Fal4

                          All thee belonged to the Lightsey Carroll Distributors, and the crew along with the beer haulers, are seen posing in front of the State Capitol building in Austin, Texas. The photo is dated May 25, 1934, which was only five months after Prohibition had ended on December 5, 1933. It appears that the Distributor quickly put its fleet together, to deliver the Falstaff beer they handled to its thirsty customers in the Capitol region.

                          The Model “A” was also quite popular with ranchers in Texas, for getting their cattle to the stockyards. The photo below from the Cattle Raisers Museum in Fort Worth,shows a number of Fords including a 1930 or 1931 “AA” at the top serving as a tractor for a cattle trailer. In the middle is a “AA” flatbed of the same vintage and at the bottom is a 1928 or 1929 Tudor Sedan serving as a tow vehicle for a small trailer. Top photo courtesy of The University of North Texas Libraries.

                          Fal5

                          taxi.jpg
                          2 1930 Tudors

                          Henry Ford said
                          "It's all nuts and bolts"


                          Mitch's Auto Service ctr

                          Comment


                          • #22
                            Three Model “A” Fords To Go – Taylor Truck-a-Way Co.







                            This load of three new 1930 Model “A” Fords is on a semi-trailer manufactured by the Taylor Truck-a-Way Co. of Los Angeles, CA. At the time, a rig of this type was used for local and regional transport, and long-distance transport of automobiles was handled primarily by train. The lightweight trailer frame is constructed in the form of a lattice girder that is resistant to bending. The lower part of the fifth wheel hitch on the truck is of the conventional type but uses a lightweight horizontal top section as seen in the second photo below.

                            The invention of the semi-trailer is attributed to August C. Fruehauf and Otto Neumann, and the first one was constructed in 1914 in Fruehauf’s blacksmith shop in Detroit, MI. The firm later used a hitch invented by Hermann Farr and produced by Charles Martin’s Rocking Hitch Company in Springfield, MA, before developing its own device.

                            Hopefully, our readers will tell us more about the three 1930 Standard Model Fords and the 1928 or ’29 Ford Model “A” tractor. The photos are courtesy of the USC Libraries.

                            1930-ford-model-a-fordor-tudor-coupe

                            1929-model-a-ford-truck-and-fifth-wheel-hitch
                            2 1930 Tudors

                            Henry Ford said
                            "It's all nuts and bolts"


                            Mitch's Auto Service ctr

                            Comment


                            • Jeff/Illinois
                              Jeff/Illinois commented
                              Editing a comment
                              Nice. What clear, crisp pictures fun to look at thanks for posting these

                            • BNCHIEF
                              BNCHIEF commented
                              Editing a comment
                              Notice the lack of any tie down equipment. Also the unique spring arrangement on the truck.

                            • tchbil
                              tchbil commented
                              Editing a comment
                              looks like the truck has air line to hook up to trailer glad hands....would like to see how air brake systems were fitted to an AA truck

                          • #23
                            That is actually an early 30 tractor. Note the Budd wheels, and dual rear wheels, and the 30 front bumper.
                            Bill
                            http://www.brauchauto.com/
                            Eastern Connecticut

                            Comment


                            • #24
                              Check out this link that was in post #19

                              http://www.coachbuilt.com/bui/f/ford/ford.htm
                              2 1930 Tudors

                              Henry Ford said
                              "It's all nuts and bolts"


                              Mitch's Auto Service ctr

                              Comment


                              • BNCHIEF
                                BNCHIEF commented
                                Editing a comment
                                Mitch the member here that thought he had a picture of his grandfather with Henry Ford the picture he had was not but that body he was working on looks like a coachbuilt body or construction.

                            • #25
                              Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade Circa 1930






                              November 24, 2016
                              Hopefully, this Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade photograph will put a smile on your face today for the holiday. The annual parade began in 1924 and attracted over a 250,000 people who were entertained by marching bands, floats, and animals. Three years later in 1927, the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company produced the first helium-filled rubber balloons used in the Parade sponsored by Macy’s Department Store.

                              This image appears to be circa 1930 based on the appearance of the Packard and Model “A” Ford sedans in the lower right-hand corner of the photo courtesy of Macy’s Department Store.
                              2 1930 Tudors

                              Henry Ford said
                              "It's all nuts and bolts"


                              Mitch's Auto Service ctr

                              Comment

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