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  • Front Seals

    How long do these front oil pan and timing cover gaskets need to be soaked in oil???

  • #2
    When I did my lower end repair, I put the rope in oil the same day I got the gasket set, which was about 3 weeks before I did the repair.

    Your Timing May Vary.
    You wana look waaay far up da road and plan yer route because the brakes are far more of a suggestion than a command!

    Comment


    • #3
      Some people soak them and some do it dry. It's a preference thing
      What works for some may not work for others

      https://www.vintagefordforum.com/for...pe-seal-advice
      3 ~ Tudor's
      Henry Ford said
      "It's all nuts and bolts"


      Mitch's Auto Service ctr

      Comment


      • BILL WILLIAMSON
        BILL WILLIAMSON commented
        Editing a comment
        Sorta' like, how long do you soak your PASTA, before BOILING it?----LOL

    • #4
      I've always just put the rope seals in dry, with some Permatex in the groove, and wipe a bit of grease on the part that shows. Works for me
      Has it ever occurred to you that the sole purpose for your existence might be to serve as a warning to others?

      Comment


      • BILL WILLIAMSON
        BILL WILLIAMSON commented
        Editing a comment
        Some gasket sets have a PERFECTLY formed rope seal, that just lays in nice & ONLY needs a smear of grease, on the contact area!
        Dad Searchforthem

    • #5
      Ok im learning..... again!!!!!!!....my oil pan should be back from powder coating today....so being over zealous i put the rope seals in oil last night......i probably should have checked them on the pan and timing cover first???!!!! to see if they fit then just permatex???.......in reading the red book it also says to soak the cork rear pan seal????? that to me seems weird will it seal just being soaked in grease......how have you guys done the rear seals??

      Comment


      • DaWizard
        DaWizard commented
        Editing a comment
        You don't soak the cork seal in oil, you soak it in water in a tuna can and when you do it swells and after it is installed conforms better to the oil pan lip. There is really nothing more than the pan pressure to keep the oil in the pan.

    • #6
      Ck out post #3 here.
      https://www.vintagefordforum.com/for...-engine-topics

      When you Permatex the corners make sure it is clean and dry of any oil.


      A word of warning about powder coating an oil pan. Me being the PC king i had one done so something to watch out for. The bung for the oil plug is leaded in place. The heat from the oven melted this lead and caused the bung to break loose once the engine was in the car. I will never PC another, paint is good enough for the pan. Just wanted to share one of my life's hard learned lessons.
      3 ~ Tudor's
      Henry Ford said
      "It's all nuts and bolts"


      Mitch's Auto Service ctr

      Comment


      • Chevmn56
        Chevmn56 commented
        Editing a comment
        Oh Shite.....more learning

      • CarlG
        CarlG commented
        Editing a comment
        I had my pan all cleaned up ready to go to the Powder Coater a while back.. I just happened on this little jewel of information somewhere (don't really remember where), but changed plans and painted it.

    • #7
      Soak'em,it satisfies the gods,when you pull the pan on the block or the timing cover down you'll get your first drip,fulfilling your sacrifice to a higher power,from then on you'll be leak free.. I second the no powder coating,I dont see the need for it on any part of a model a to be powdercoated

      Comment


      • #8
        CM2
        I dont see the need for it on any part of a model a to be powdercoated
        That part i disagree with
        Many vintage restorations have some powder coating, what makes a Model A any different? For the most part you cant even tell what it is anyway
        3 ~ Tudor's
        Henry Ford said
        "It's all nuts and bolts"


        Mitch's Auto Service ctr

        Comment


        • #9
          Originally posted by CM2 View Post
          Soak'em,it satisfies the gods,when you pull the pan on the block or the timing cover down you'll get your first drip,fulfilling your sacrifice to a higher power,from then on you'll be leak free.. I second the no powder coating,I dont see the need for it on any part of a model a to be powdercoated
          I think its a personal preference...im wishing i would have posted theses questions sooner 2 steps forward and 3 back with the oil pan.....probably should have just had it blasted Oh well.....i like the toughness of PC, and the ability to buff it back out if worn or dull. Most engine splash pans are powdercoated from venders. A couple even offer both PC and non.

          Comment


          • #10
            On this Lucy build everything you see on the chassis is PC'ed. And i mean everything, down to the axle housing, steering, leaf springs, backing plates , frame, brake rods, every single part. She has received AACA grand national status, and touring class 498 points, 500 if not for a hairline crack in the steering wheel. The wheel has since been changed out. Fine point judges have looked at this car as well. Nobody knows what it is other than looking for the correct sheen. The frame is semigloss and the rest is gloss

            https://www.vintagefordforum.com/for...or-build-diary
            3 ~ Tudor's
            Henry Ford said
            "It's all nuts and bolts"


            Mitch's Auto Service ctr

            Comment


            • #11
              We find it much easier to fill and touch up scratched paint than powder coat. PC'ing the side splash pans can be an issue when installing with car fully assembled as they can get scratched especially near the drag link . We've also had problems with oil soaking the replacement teflon type rope seals because as stated, with oil, when setting w/ permatex , the sealant doesn't adhere well in the groove. . Some suggest soaking the original asbestos type rope (not usually available) in ATF to get better results without using sealant.
              Last edited by plyfor; 01-20-2018, 12:05 PM.

              Comment


              • Mitch
                Mitch commented
                Editing a comment
                I can touch this up just as easy as doing paint.

            • #12
              All right,I'm a cheap bastid..that being said we should have a picture thread for the chassis drivers...with extra points for the most homie lash up dashboards...

              Comment


              • Mitch
                Mitch commented
                Editing a comment
                I may be a sick bastid for doing that but she looks amazing, and like the day i putter together.. I would do it all over the same way

            • #13
              I personally would not soak the rear main seal in oil, I do not see the need. And once you do that, good luck using any permatex on there, especially the corners. There is a lot in that book I disagree with.

              I would also not blast an oil pan, or anything to do with oiling. Media blasting puts grit in places you can't normally get it to go, and will eventually get washed out by hot oil flow, and perhaps make it to a bearing somewhere.

              Comment


              • #14
                Sometimes cork gaskets are dry and hard, so I soak them in hot water for 10 minutes, then pat them dry and install them in the curved groove while they are still very pliable. I wouldn't soak cork nor the front seal in oil. The first Model A engine I worked on I soaked it in oil, and it was an oily mess to install. I install it dry and use a socket or tool I made to form it to the size of the front pulley. I then squirt some oil on the seal and smear grease on it.

                Sometimes cork gaskets need to be soaked in hot water to make them expand a bit. Then pat them dry and install them before they dry up and shrink again. Todays cork and rubber mix gaskets don't seem to have this problem, and usually fit well out of the box. I'd cement the pan gasket to the engine block, then give the pan side a thin layer of grease. This way when you drop the pan to adjust the shims, the pan should come off clean, while the gasket remains on the block and might be fine to use again.

                Comment


                • DaWizard
                  DaWizard commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Tom, I do just the opposite with the pan gasket. I permatex the gasket to the pan so IF it all doesn't come down with the pan, you are only cleaning the block a little. The pan gasket is now easily removed from the pan on the bench, not scraping off gasket on your back under the car.

              • #15
                Dry as long as you lube the face of the rope,the rope need to be impregnated with some kind of lube to be effective. Soaking makes the rope pliable for seating against the crank,but you guys are right about sealant,cept for maybe some of the modern gasket makers..aviation permatex is traditional no doubt,but outdated.

                Comment


                • #16
                  Right Stuff will work around some oil residue

                  https://www.permatex.com/products/ga...e-gasket-grey/
                  3 ~ Tudor's
                  Henry Ford said
                  "It's all nuts and bolts"


                  Mitch's Auto Service ctr

                  Comment


                  • #17
                    Thanks for all the good info again!!!!! I truly appreciate it!!!

                    Comment

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