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What is the advantage of putting sleeves in and going back to standard.

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  • What is the advantage of putting sleeves in and going back to standard.

    I under stand if you can not go bigger. But it sounds like some put sleeves in even if they have room to bore more.

  • #2
    Without something detremental like a cracked cyl wall or the last boring job that put the cyl's badly out of line I would not sleeve. No replacement for displacement. JMHO. Rod
    "Much of the social history of the Western world, over the past three decades, has been a history of replacing what worked with what sounded good." Thomas Sowell

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    • #3
      I sleeved back to standard in my coupe, and that seems to have been one cause for my overheating problem, because the sleeves were honed to .003 per mfg. specs. After rehoning to .0045, no more overheating. Something to do with heat dissipation and sleeves, I think.

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      • #4
        Possibly, Ray, but even without sleeves I always hone my cylinders out to .0035 cyls 1 and 2, and .0045 cyls. 3 and 4.
        As far as I am concerned, you would never be wrong to hone them all to .0045 sleeves or not.
        And as you know, we have built a lot of motors here, and not just Model A. I have never experienced piston slap in any motor we have ever built

        Note, we are most always using cast pistons in an A.
        If this were a case of forged pistons, which we are putting in the '47 Stude, then the manufacturer will tell you the clearance, and you will be able to believe it, since forged pistons do not expand as much. More pricey, tho. Instead of 100 bucks a set, think 1000 bucks a set.

        For forged, think Ross pistons, etc, and not these no-name jewels we get from the suppliers. For a Model A, I actually use a piston supplied by Egge, at 250 bucks a set, and will use no other.

        Those little slips of paper that come with the cast Model A pistons that say 'use .002' lie
        Last edited by tbirdtbird; 01-19-2018, 09:56 PM.

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        • #5
          Like a bore job,the sleeve is only as good as the guy setting it.Been around wet and dry liners for years,dry pressed in are fool proof.Gives a block as second life,and acts like a pin with any cracks.

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          • George Miller
            George Miller commented
            Editing a comment
            How much smaller do you recommend boring the block then the sleeve OD size?
            Last edited by George Miller; 01-20-2018, 10:19 AM.

          • CM2
            CM2 commented
            Editing a comment
            Brent posted up the sleeve spec awhile back..I'm not a machinist sir,I just measure and assemble the fine work you guys do.

        • #6
          Originally posted by tbirdtbird View Post
          Possibly, Ray, but even without sleeves I always hone my cylinders out to .0035 cyls 1 and 2, and .0045 cyls. 3 and 4.
          As far as I am concerned, you would never be wrong to hone them all to .0045 sleeves or not.
          And as you know, we have built a lot of motors here, and not just Model A. I have never experienced piston slap in any motor we have ever built

          Note, we are most always using cast pistons in an A.
          If this were a case of forged pistons, which we are putting in the '47 Stude, then the manufacturer will tell you the clearance, and you will be able to believe it, since forged pistons do not expand as much. More pricey, tho. Instead of 100 bucks a set, think 1000 bucks a set.

          For forged, think Ross pistons, etc, and not these no-name jewels we get from the suppliers. For a Model A, I actually use a piston supplied by Egge, at 250 bucks a set, and will use no other.

          Those little slips of paper that come with the cast Model A pistons that say 'use .002' lie
          As you know Dave, you were a big help in my getting this engine back to right. Since the .0045 hone it has run perfectly. No seizing, no overheating, lots of pep! My little slip of paper said "use .003." Which I did. Big mistake!
          Last edited by Ray Horton; 01-20-2018, 10:50 AM.

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          • #7
            Excellent thread, and a good read. Thank you, for starting this conversation. Jeff
            Twiss Collector Car Parts

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            • #8
              I going with tbird. To big is better than to small in this case. The back two cylinders need all the help they can get. scored cylinders are not good.

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              • #9
                Brent, of course this is VERY true:
                "With regard to bore clearances, I believe someone needs to clarify these numbers suggested above are to be calculated off of actual piston sizes"
                Not everyone has the proper equipment to take these measurements or even a dial bore gauge to truly know the cylinder bore accurately. This stuff is often better left to a qualified engine builder

                Ray, I am glad that your engine troubles are over! You had enough misery

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                • #10
                  • BRENT in 10-uh-C commented
                    • Today, 07:36 AM
                      Do you know who the piston manufacturer is that is putting those slips of paper in? I use Pistons coming from Snyders (-which don't come with any paper slips), and I have always wanted to heat a piston in an oven and then measure it to verify the amount of thermal expansion it actually has. It would be interesting to compare the two pistons to see if the pistons that come with the paper slips has similar expansion rates.
                  Brent
                  What do you set your piston to wall clearance at on the Snyder pistons? Do you keep them all the same or add more for 3 & 4?
                  3 ~ Tudor's
                  Henry Ford said
                  "It's all nuts and bolts"


                  Mitch's Auto Service ctr

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