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Steering Quadrant replace /repair?

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  • Steering Quadrant replace /repair?

    Are there any methods (other than filing, etc.) or parts available to repair the worn spark/throttle rod quadrants?

  • #2
    I would support the backside of the quadrants, then use a chisel to stamp in the indents, rather than file away good metal.

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    • #3
      Two other things come to mind that may result in poor lever to indent contact. The lower control lever springs need to be in good shape. The pressure on those springs pull the levers down against the detents. If the springs are weak the levers can float upwards / away or not have good pressure. Make sure the lips that the detents are etched on are not bent backwards. You can go from behind with a flat stock and tap those lips a tad to add more pressure for the contact. It has been my experience with new springs and a slight tap - tap that the levers wont move even with worn detents.
      3 ~ Tudor's
      Henry Ford said
      "It's all nuts and bolts"


      Mitch's Auto Service ctr

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    • #4
      I had a mildly worn quadrant and slightly flat arms on the rods. It was strongly recommended to dress the quads with a chisel and make the rods the correct round.

      So I did.

      Worked wonders and I got a very solid click.

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      • #5
        I agree with Mitch. My quadrant was badly worn and the levers would not stay in position. I lived with it for awhile until my steering shaft broke. While repairing that, I replaced the springs and it made all the difference even without doing any work on the worn quadrant.

        Glen

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        • #6
          Originally posted by glentre View Post
          I agree with Mitch. My quadrant was badly worn and the levers would not stay in position. I lived with it for awhile until my steering shaft broke. While repairing that, I replaced the springs and it made all the difference even without doing any work on the worn quadrant.

          Glen
          Which part broke? I've seen welded steering jackets, but never heard of a steering shaft breaking.
          My 28 notches are also worn smooth, but the levers stay in place. In fact it took some Kroil to even get them freed up when I first bought the car in 1999.

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          • #7
            Originally posted by Tom Wesenberg View Post

            Which part broke? I've seen welded steering jackets, but never heard of a steering shaft breaking.
            My 28 notches are also worn smooth, but the levers stay in place. In fact it took some Kroil to even get them freed up when I first bought the car in 1999.
            Sorry, Tom. Wrong description. It was the jacket, not the shaft. Some photos of the broken jacket. It had been welded before after breaking sometime prior to my owning the car. I was going to work on the quadrant after repairing the break and installing new springs but the springs held the levers so tight, it wasn't necessary. Very easy to replace the springs with the assembly out of the car....not so easy with it in.

            Glen
            You do not have permission to view this gallery.
            This gallery has 4 photos.

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            • #8
              I remember that issue, and you had a car show to attend at the time.
              Tom has a home made spring tool which makes it easier to do in the car. Out of the car is always nice though.
              3 ~ Tudor's
              Henry Ford said
              "It's all nuts and bolts"


              Mitch's Auto Service ctr

              Comment


              • #9
                I guess no one makes a replacement serrated piece to insert on the worn area. So,in the interim, I just cut a thin Revlon metal nail file to shape and stuck it between the rod, etc. with some blue bolt thread thread locker. Another option perhaps would be to make a serrated metal piece with a cut groove and slip it over the quadrants, based on an actual non-worn original pattern.

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