Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Original Tire Pumps

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Original Tire Pumps

    The brazing is sloppier than I anticipated.


    I am restoring a couple of Model A pumps. What are your thoughts on the warpage of the base? Do you think it is from 90 years of use and abuse or is the warpage due to excessive heat from brazing during manufacturing? Or, possibly a little of both?
    Attached Files
    Last edited by Paul; 10-09-2019, 06:44 PM.

  • #2
    My guess excessive heat from a previous repair

    Comment


    • #3
      I think the pump was used in soft dirt and the base wings bent up when the handle was forced down.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Curly View Post
        I think the pump was used in soft dirt and the base wings bent up when the handle was forced down.
        I agree.

        Comment


        • #5
          Too much braze. bent in use.
          20191009_184622.jpg
          http://jmodela.coffeecup.com

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Paul View Post
            warpage due to excessive heat from brazing during manufacturing?
            In that case it would have been either repaired or scrapped!

            Comment


            • #7
              These bases were not the strongest in the world as they just are stamped hollow steel, not solid, so my guess is the same as above, I would agree it probably just bent from use.
              “If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went.” (Will Rogers).

              Comment


              • #8
                The metal base is soft steel, not hardened, and is easy to straighten. Clamp one foot of the base in a bench vice with the barrel horizontal and pointing towards you. Lift gently and slowly using the barrel as leverage. Flip it over and clamp the other foot and repeat. Stand it up on a flat surface to check for straightness. Repeat as needed until you are satisfied that the bottom is flat and the barrel stands vertical. I've straightened several this way. I also made a close fitting mandrel about three inches long and with a tapered point and attached to a two foot long rod. This is to insert into the barrel tube to remove dents. The mandrel is only about 0.005" smaller diameter than the inside of the tube. Using a trim hammer with light tap-tap-tap smooths out most dents.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by DBaldwin View Post
                  My guess excessive heat from a previous repair
                  To the best of my knowledge everything appeared to be original paint.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Don Turley View Post
                    The metal base is soft steel, not hardened, and is easy to straighten. Clamp one foot of the base in a bench vice with the barrel horizontal and pointing towards you. Lift gently and slowly using the barrel as leverage. Flip it over and clamp the other foot and repeat. Stand it up on a flat surface to check for straightness. Repeat as needed until you are satisfied that the bottom is flat and the barrel stands vertical. I've straightened several this way. I also made a close fitting mandrel about three inches long and with a tapered point and attached to a two foot long rod. This is to insert into the barrel tube to remove dents. The mandrel is only about 0.005" smaller diameter than the inside of the tube. Using a trim hammer with light tap-tap-tap smooths out most dents.

                    Nothing like shop teacher safety! Obviously I did this at home last night with no students watching. Paint sticks would of been a better choice over box cutter blades (at least smarter, but the blades worked well, no dents from the C-Clamps). By adjusting the C-Clamps I was able to balance out the pressure on each side of the base. I kept the tube vertical and perpendicular to the table while straightening. Note: I chose not to file the brazing smooth, all indications pointed to "that's the way it was".


                    IMG_20191006_141659.jpg

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Looks to me like those kids have a great shop teacher.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Don Turley View Post
                        The metal base is soft steel, not hardened, and is easy to straighten. Clamp one foot of the base in a bench vice with the barrel horizontal and pointing towards you. Lift gently and slowly using the barrel as leverage. Flip it over and clamp the other foot and repeat. Stand it up on a flat surface to check for straightness. Repeat as needed until you are satisfied that the bottom is flat and the barrel stands vertical. I've straightened several this way. I also made a close fitting mandrel about three inches long and with a tapered point and attached to a two foot long rod. This is to insert into the barrel tube to remove dents. The mandrel is only about 0.005" smaller diameter than the inside of the tube. Using a trim hammer with light tap-tap-tap smooths out most dents.
                        Sorry Don for not being up on this terminology but what is a "mandrel". Is this a piece of hardwood???

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Fred K Here is the definition of the word mandrel - it has been used many ways - in this case it would be made to closely fit into the barrel of an undamaged pump, being as the pump barrel is made of a soft metal, it could possibly be made from a hard wood - then tapped down into a damaged barrel causing the barrels dents to be removed.
                          noun Machinery.

                          a shaft or bar the end of which is inserted into a workpiece to hold it during machining.
                          a spindle on which a circular saw or grinding wheel rotates.
                          the driving spindle in the headstock of a lathe.
                          “If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went.” (Will Rogers).

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I have attached some photos of the tool that I made to remove dents from the tire pump tubes. The "mandrel" (or whatever you want to call it) is 1.170" diameter and 2" long. The tip end is tapered for 3/8", from 1.100" at the tip to allow easier insertion into the tube. The shaft is 3/4" diameter by 21" long. It is all made of mild steel. The shaft was welded to the mandrel prior to machining the finished mandrel. That way the shaft and mandrel are concentric.
                            To use this tool, I first remove the handle and plunger of the tire pump leaving just the base and steel tube. I then bead-blast the pump and use a sharpie pen to mark the dents. I stand the pump upright on the floor and hold it down with my feet. I apply some oil to the tool and insert the tip end of the tool into the tube, align it as best possible and gently hammer the tool in until it has reached the bottom of the tube. This will push out the major dents. There should be approximately 4 inches of the shaft still exposed. Clamp the end of the shaft horizontally in a vice. Notice in the third photo, I marked a spot on my workbench that is in alignment with the mandrel. I then retract the pump tube to where one of the dents will be on the top side of the mandrel and use a small trim hammer and tap-tap-tap gently at the dent and all around it. Once the dent is smoothed out, the mandrel will slide easily past that area and I move on to the next dent. Once all of the dents have been removed, the mandrel will slide through the tube easily. Using some 320 sandpaper over the outside surface of the tube I can find any remaining small dents. Once I am satisfied that I have removed the dents, I bead-blast it again and paint with satin black spray paint. Since the threads at the top of the tube are very fine where the cap screws on, I mask those threads before painting. If there are pits in the metal, I apply some filler primer and sand prior to painting black.
                            Just to be clear, I do not have a lathe so I had a machine shop make the tool to my specifications.
                            You do not have permission to view this gallery.
                            This gallery has 3 photos.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Looks like Phil Swift fixed that one with Flex Seal.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by Don Turley View Post
                                I have attached some photos of the tool that I made to remove dents from the tire pump tubes. The "mandrel" (or whatever you want to call it) is 1.170" diameter and 2" long. The tip end is tapered for 3/8", from 1.100" at the tip to allow easier insertion into the tube. The shaft is 3/4" diameter by 21" long. It is all made of mild steel. The shaft was welded to the mandrel prior to machining the finished mandrel. That way the shaft and mandrel are concentric.
                                To use this tool, I first remove the handle and plunger of the tire pump leaving just the base and steel tube. I then bead-blast the pump and use a sharpie pen to mark the dents. I stand the pump upright on the floor and hold it down with my feet. I apply some oil to the tool and insert the tip end of the tool into the tube, align it as best possible and gently hammer the tool in until it has reached the bottom of the tube. This will push out the major dents. There should be approximately 4 inches of the shaft still exposed. Clamp the end of the shaft horizontally in a vice. Notice in the third photo, I marked a spot on my workbench that is in alignment with the mandrel. I then retract the pump tube to where one of the dents will be on the top side of the mandrel and use a small trim hammer and tap-tap-tap gently at the dent and all around it. Once the dent is smoothed out, the mandrel will slide easily past that area and I move on to the next dent. Once all of the dents have been removed, the mandrel will slide through the tube easily. Using some 320 sandpaper over the outside surface of the tube I can find any remaining small dents. Once I am satisfied that I have removed the dents, I bead-blast it again and paint with satin black spray paint. Since the threads at the top of the tube are very fine where the cap screws on, I mask those threads before painting. If there are pits in the metal, I apply some filler primer and sand prior to painting black.
                                Just to be clear, I do not have a lathe so I had a machine shop make the tool to my specifications.
                                Nice!! I used an old deep welled socket and forced it down the barrel to remove the dents. It was clumsy, but it worked. The weight of the socket was not there and made it difficult to hammer out the residual dents. I shot it with gloss black paint. It was explained to me once, that gloss paint was harder than the other paints, therefore; sanded and buffed easier. My buff jobs never come out shiny so I am hoping it will match the original paint finish.
                                Last edited by Paul; 10-14-2019, 07:15 PM.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Thanks Don,
                                  I have some original tire pumps that have dents. I like your approach over just applying a large dose of body filler.
                                  Actually I use lead instead of poly filler but your method is better.
                                  Ray

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Quick question, is it possible to identify a pumps manufacturer buy the features on the pump? For example: If the pump has either a cast or stamped top it is a ______.? IMG_20191014_180142.jpg

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      I thought I would broaden this thread a little bit. So what's not Model A? But, Still fun to collect! When you're out in the field it's nice to know what you're looking at.

                                      1st picture: The the one on the right is Model A the two on the left are early V8. Notice on the model A the hose is attached in the middle of the foot pad.IMG_20191021_095232.jpg 2nd picture: the two on the right are Model A and the two on the left are early V8. The Model A pumps have nuts at the end of the handle and the early V8's do not.
                                      IMG_20191021_100937.jpg
                                      Last edited by Paul; 10-22-2019, 05:00 PM.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Missing from my collection would be the Model A pump with Ford scrip on only one side of the base. To the best of my knowledge this pump would also be good for a 1927 Model T.

                                        Some of the pumps have a number underneath the foot pad which would designated them as a Model A or a Model T pump.

                                        The Model T pump has the Ford script stamped on both sides of the foot pad. I have found pumps both in steel and brass in varying lengths.

                                        Based on my Google knowledge (???), the double barrel Aeolus pump was supplied by Ford for the brass Model T.

                                        IMG_20191021_102740.jpg
                                        Last edited by Paul; 10-22-2019, 05:49 PM.

                                        Comment


                                        • #21
                                          This is a very informative thread
                                          3 ~ Tudor's
                                          Henry Ford said
                                          "It's all nuts and bolts"


                                          Mitch's Auto Service ctr

                                          Comment


                                          • #22
                                            Here's some more

                                            Later and early A pumps

                                            20191022_181404.jpg

                                            Underside of the later pump oft time had a puddle of paint.

                                            20191022_181230.jpg

                                            Underside of the A pump with the T part number base
                                            20191022_181312.jpg

                                            Underside with the A part number base. Hard to see.

                                            20191022_181527~2.jpg
                                            http://jmodela.coffeecup.com

                                            Comment


                                            • #23
                                              Also notice the different shape of the handle between T and A pumps (other years also)
                                              http://jmodela.coffeecup.com

                                              Comment


                                              • #24
                                                "Puddle of paint" I have made note of it in several of my pumps. Do you happen to know how and where they were held when dipped.

                                                Comment


                                                • #25
                                                  Michigan Steel Tube along with Nobblit and Sparks were producers for the early V8 pumps (The rounded bottom one is Michigan Steel Tube). I know Nobblit and Sparks produced pumps for the Model A, but what about Michigan Steel Tube? Did they make pumps for the A? Are there other manufacturers?

                                                  Comment

                                                  Related Topics

                                                  Collapse

                                                  Working...
                                                  X