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  • Amish Country

    We took a ride to Lancaster, Pa today. Gotta love the hay bailers and other farm equipment being pulled by 4 horses.



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    This gallery has 4 photos.
    3 ~ Tudor's
    Henry Ford said
    "It's all nuts and bolts"


    Mitch's Auto Service ctr

  • #2
    I agree Mitch, we love to drive our "A" to Amish country in Ohio. They use retired racing trotters for their buggy's , They love to see the old cars even though they would not drive one.

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    • #3
      The woman are tough as nails. They were out working in the fields, harvesting, driving the horses that pull the equipment. I don't think I saw one nail salon in the entire area
      3 ~ Tudor's
      Henry Ford said
      "It's all nuts and bolts"


      Mitch's Auto Service ctr

      Comment


      • #4
        When we went to Amish Country recently we only saw women working! Working in the fields, weedeating, mowing the yards, etc. The only men we saw were driving buggies

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        • #5
          First off, They're not "Dutch". Dutch is a corruption of the word "Deutsch". They are a German-Swiss offshoot of 18th century Anabaptists. The German they speak is a 18th century version that by being preserved so well, has become a recognized dialect, often called "Daitsch".Much the same as Cajun Francais. With native speakers of each, barely able to understand each other. The Amish live that anti-techology dream that we all have except during that period in life known as "Rumspring" (sp). In the late teenage years they're given freedom to live as wildly as their desires dictate. After a couple of years of this, they're asked, basically if they want to grow up and join the church. Many do, and some do not. Heres tte rub, Their family trees have no branches, only trunks. Their all related to each other! After 250 years, by now, to stay in their religion, they have been marrying second and third cousins for so long, that rare genetic situations are showing up. The only cure for which, is getting new blood introduced into these families. How to do it ? By adopting a Nazi-like "Lebensborn" program. Basically, by taking others unwanted children and raising them as Amish. Other wise, I'm afraid these really desirable people will die out, either by inability to reproduce, or through genetic destruction. It would be a shame, these are people to learn from!
          Terry

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          • #6
            Knew a guy that had a 1911 International Harvester High Wheeler (2 cyl air cooled) with artillery (wooden) wheels with rubber tires.
            He needed the wheel wood repaired (it was badly rotted from sitting on the ground for 50 yrs) and new rubber. They looked gorgeous when he got them back. I queried him, "Bob where the devil do you get this kind of repair done?"
            He smiled and said, there is still an area of the country that still uses this exact vintage technology...I looked at him with puzzlement on my face.....he said, Amish country!

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            • #7
              If one is building a house, garage, small urban barn, Amish men will get everything plumb, level and square. Only issue is that every morning you have to drive where they live, give them a ride to the job site, and return them home in late afternoon.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Terry, NJ View Post
                First off, They're not "Dutch". Dutch is a corruption of the word "Deutsch". They are a German-Swiss offshoot of 18th century Anabaptists. The German they speak is a 18th century version that by being preserved so well, has become a recognized dialect, often called "Daitsch".Much the same as Cajun Francais. With native speakers of each, barely able to understand each other. The Amish live that anti-techology dream that we all have except during that period in life known as "Rumspring" (sp). In the late teenage years they're given freedom to live as wildly as their desires dictate. After a couple of years of this, they're asked, basically if they want to grow up and join the church. Many do, and some do not. Heres tte rub, Their family trees have no branches, only trunks. Their all related to each other! After 250 years, by now, to stay in their religion, they have been marrying second and third cousins for so long, that rare genetic situations are showing up. The only cure for which, is getting new blood introduced into these families. How to do it ? By adopting a Nazi-like "Lebensborn" program. Basically, by taking others unwanted children and raising them as Amish. Other wise, I'm afraid these really desirable people will die out, either by inability to reproduce, or through genetic destruction. It would be a shame, these are people to learn from!
                Terry
                That is the most accurate description of the Amish that I have seen written. I always enjoy visiting that area, and did it for many years, while going to the Hershey show. I always stay in Ronks, which is near RT 30, and in the thick of Amish country.
                Bill
                http://www.brauchauto.com/
                Eastern Connecticut

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                • #9
                  I was working in that part of PA a few years ago. Took a drive one day and noticed a harvester that was being pulled by horses, but it had a diesel engine mounted on the harvester that was running full out. Assume it was driving the thresher. Unsure how this fits into their lifestyle, but understand the need to put some modern horsepower to this part of the operation.
                  Jon.
                  "That sounds like a terrible idea.... What time?"

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                  • #10
                    When I lived in northern Mich we had a Amish settlement just a couple miles away. They were good framers and good at making things.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Jwmckenzie View Post
                      I was working in that part of PA a few years ago. Took a drive one day and noticed a harvester that was being pulled by horses, but it had a diesel engine mounted on the harvester that was running full out. Assume it was driving the thresher. Unsure how this fits into their lifestyle, but understand the need to put some modern horsepower to this part of the operation.
                      It can be a little weird! The amish use modern power, but cannot depend on it. That's why the horses pull the machine but a diesel engine runs it. As soon as they allow the engine to drive it, the horses would be sold and their dependence on modern technology would be complete. This way they will never be in the position of having a barn full of broken down machinery and the crops rotting on the fields. You see old International H s and M s on steel wheels. Steel doesn't go flat! Curiously, there is a lot of Tobacco raised out there. I wonder where they sell it. Last time I went to Schwalms, I saw a lot of the Amish men and women working in the fields harvesting. FWIW Schwalms is right in the middle of the Amish country.
                      Terry

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Terry, NJ View Post
                        Schwalms is right in the middle of the Amish country
                        Yes, that is where I was headed that day.

                        Thanks for the info, makes sense.
                        Jon.
                        "That sounds like a terrible idea.... What time?"

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                        • #13
                          So how was the "Shoofly Pie"? It looks like a cookie.
                          Ron

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                          • #14
                            We went to this place https://www.mysheds.com/ for a custom built pool shed. The stuff there is really cool and they build everything right on the premises. Those huge two story garages can be placed on a concrete pad and cinder blocks if you like. The facade can be matched to look like your existing house. All kinds of things from dog pens to hunting hangouts. The pie was fantastic and its not flat like a cookie. It's filled with shoefly's
                            3 ~ Tudor's
                            Henry Ford said
                            "It's all nuts and bolts"


                            Mitch's Auto Service ctr

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I practically live in downtown Amish country here in Clinton County Pa. There are a lot of farms in Clinton County and 95% are owned by Amish.They are wonderful people that just love the Model A. I have talked to many of them and they really appreciate these old cars.

                              Most of the food we eat comes directly from there farms and there is one place we purchase all our meat and the maple/blueberry breakfast sausage is to die for.

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                              • #16
                                Originally posted by Skimmerbob View Post
                                So how was the "Shoofly Pie"? It looks like a cookie.
                                Bob the wet bottom shoofly pie is absolutely the bomb. The homemade molasses they use is fantastic.

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                                • #17
                                  I’ve not really been to Amish country so I’m not familiar with a Shoofly pie, but if I find myself in Amish country I will definitely try it now.
                                  Ron

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                                  • #18
                                    https://www.google.com/search?client...&q=Shoofly+pie

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                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by Mitch View Post
                                      We went to this place https://www.mysheds.com/ for a custom built pool shed. The stuff there is really cool and they build everything right on the premises. Those huge two story garages can be placed on a concrete pad and cinder blocks if you like. The facade can be matched to look like your existing house. All kinds of things from dog pens to hunting hangouts. The pie was fantastic and its not flat like a cookie. It's filled with shoefly's
                                      Mitch, I make and sell Shoefly swats. They are similar to fly swats but larger..

                                      TOB

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                                      • #20
                                        I’m headed to Schwalm’s later this month to get my spindles rebuilt. Many of the Amish from the Lancaster area moved to Central PA a number of years ago. They could buy larger farms by selling some of their land in the Lancaster Area. My relatives in Loganton PA (Sugar Valley area) and the arrival of the Amish really improved the economy in that area. I love Kaufman’s Hardware in Loganton. Loganton isn”t far from Lock Haven just off Rt 80. They are great neighbors.

                                        Comment


                                        • #21
                                          We used to love to drive to Shady Maple and Goods store when we loved in PA. Great food, good prices and wonderful people there. We also watched folks working in the field and the kids selling produce in the road side stands. Fond memories.
                                          Also, as Mitch mentioned , drove by "My sheds". I always wanted one, but lived in an apartment... now in wish they were closer!!

                                          Comment


                                          • #22
                                            Originally posted by Supergnat View Post
                                            I’m headed to Schwalm’s later this month to get my spindles rebuilt. Many of the Amish from the Lancaster area moved to Central PA a number of years ago. They could buy larger farms by selling some of their land in the Lancaster Area. My relatives in Loganton PA (Sugar Valley area) and the arrival of the Amish really improved the economy in that area. I love Kaufman’s Hardware in Loganton. Loganton isn”t far from Lock Haven just off Rt 80. They are great neighbors.
                                            Supergnat,you are in my neighborhood when talking about Loganton and Kaufmans Hardware ( Amish walmart ).lol I live in Mc Elhattan and can look out my picture window and see Loganton Mountain.

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                                            • #23
                                              When I was out in Shipshawanna IN for the MARC membership meet, the Amish buggies had worn the shoulder lane on the roads down from their horses. And boy do they move fast.

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                                              • #24
                                                there is a large Amish community less than an hour from me in central IL, Arthur. Grandparents lived in the area and spent most of my summers there. Amish do use power at work, but not at home. Often get taken by shuttle van to the hospital where my wife works for baby deliveries.

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                                                • #25
                                                  When we lived in western New York, we would drive down and meet Kentucky friends in Millersburg, Ohio. One morning while sitting out behind the B&B, I watched a young kid driving an old New Idea manure spreader with a draft horse. But I also heard a big diesel running somewhere on the same farm, but couldn't see it. The owner of the house joined me out back and explained that it all depended on the Elder of that particular group. As that was the most sensible and profitable way to run a dairy operation... The various communities there would also go in together and have a phone line dropped, then build a phone booth near the road. I had to ask about that too. Looked like really nice privies, but I knew that wasn't what they were. They sure do good work.

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