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  • Then and Now

    This was in the Sis-Q A’s newsletter. I thought it was worth sharing


    5B21B0DB-FD5B-4B2A-8844-93E013AE9D7C.jpeg
    4~ Tudor's
    1~ Coupe

    Henry Ford said,
    "It's all nuts and bolts"


    Mitch's Auto Service ctr

  • #2
    Years ago they predicted this would happen, and they said we would have more leisure time. They forgot to mention we would not have a job.
    Bill
    http://www.brauchauto.com/
    Eastern Connecticut

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    • #3
      They were right though about the rise of a whole new field of employment,... technology. But it needs the be said that the skill sets of the two areas are totally different.
      Last edited by Mickey; 03-28-2019, 07:20 AM.

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      • #4
        The old cartoon about The Jetson's when George Jetson was complaining about, "having to push that button all day".
        This is our new reality. Jeff
        Twiss Collector Car Parts

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        • #5
          works for me, more time to sip margaritas on the beach
          1928 Tudor

          Variety is the spice of life

          Wise man once told me you don’t know what you don’t know

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          • #6
            Yea, if you can pay for em!
            B.

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            • #7
              I used to plow snow at a place that made roofing materials.When they opened that plant in 1993 they employed 96 people.Now they produce four times the product,and employ 26 to make it.That's not including the office workers.None of those jobs are for the uneducated,lots of high tech involved.Even the forklift operator has to be able to program,troubleshoot,and repair the machinery.

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              • #8
                So... Do we have less jobs now or did things balance out?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Do robots build robots? Where will it end?
                  1928 Tudor

                  Variety is the spice of life

                  Wise man once told me you don’t know what you don’t know

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                  • #10
                    Speaking as one who has been in the tool & die business since the mid 60's, while manufacturing in the US is making a comeback, it will never reach the level of the 60's and 70's. Not even considering the jobs that went overseas, technology as reduced the manpower needed dramatically. Toolmakers are a dying breed. Last year the average age was address in a trade publication. I can't remember the exact age, but it was a lot closer to 65 than 30!

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by mshmodela
                      Learn to repair robots.
                      With the newest generation of pallet trucks we received I am learning to repair them. They only need a human to push a button to safely advance down the isle. There are others in another distribution centers that pick the items from the racks and place them on pallets. The future is here guys we just need to figure out what we need to do to fit in and be employable. Rod

                      "Much of the social history of the Western world, over the past three decades, has been a history of replacing what worked with what sounded good." Thomas Sowell

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by slammin View Post
                        Speaking as one who has been in the tool & die business since the mid 60's, while manufacturing in the US is making a comeback, it will never reach the level of the 60's and 70's. Not even considering the jobs that went overseas, technology as reduced the manpower needed dramatically. Toolmakers are a dying breed. Last year the average age was address in a trade publication. I can't remember the exact age, but it was a lot closer to 65 than 30!
                        I too, was a tool and die maker and I concur. Also the level of die work coming from China is pretty darn good these days. What scared me in the seventies was the level of die work on their coinage. I knew several Russian expats who occasionally went back to Stalin's motherland (Or Brezhnev's, the old USSR) and brought me coins , which were difficult to get out at that time (1970s) I was very happy to get them as they were almost impossible to find here. I examined them under magnification and found the work to be excellent. Just about all of their coinage contained a sun burst on the obverse which made me wonder how their dies were standing up, what kind of usage, die life they were getting. How do they sharpen the dies? The quality their work was very high. And we were making jokes about their cars, TV sets, refrigerators, and ball point pens. I'm afraid we will never see a lot of the work that was here in the seventies again.
                        Terry

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                        • #13
                          It would be interesting to add a third picture to the two above that Mitch posted 90 or so years from now! Oh well...I will view it from above...maybe.

                          Pluck

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Steve Plucker View Post
                            It would be interesting to add a third picture to the two above that Mitch posted 90 or so years from now! Oh well...I will view it from above...maybe.

                            Pluck
                            Some of us may have a view through the glass ceiling! Jeff
                            Twiss Collector Car Parts

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