Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Oil Pan Gasket Leaks-- Gasket brand suggestions, experiences requested

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Oil Pan Gasket Leaks-- Gasket brand suggestions, experiences requested

    Just tried the Snyder's "no seal" oil pan gasket.We used no sealer as instructed. It seems to work ok on the sides at about 6 to 7'# of bolt torque but can't get the rear " no seal" bearing piece from the kit to seal well. Should we go to the thinner Fel Pro type composition/cork gasket all around and /or just for the rear bearing cap? The front teflon rope doesn't seal well either but maybe that needs some time to work in. Sealed all the corners, etc. with Perm 2.
    Any suggestions appreciated.

  • #2
    This is what I use as a reference and has done very well for me in the past.
    http://www.sacramentocapitolas.org/s...et-Article.pdf
    You wana look waaay far up da road and plan yer route because the brakes are far more of a suggestion than a command!

    Comment


    • BNCHIEF
      BNCHIEF commented
      Editing a comment
      Followed the same advice on my motor as well no leaks,

  • #3
    Ok thanks; I think the problem is the gasket material and that the gasket sides were short at the front pulley and didn't cover over the white rope ends. We'll go back to the thinner cork/combo gasket but no fun with the splash pans on!. .. We installed very similar to the article pdf. by the way which was very helpful.

    Comment


    • Mitch
      Mitch commented
      Editing a comment
      i always use the cork style
      that article is listed in the technical section under engine topics for future reference

  • #4
    Should we coat the cork gasket with copper coat or something similar? The article says not to but the old cork type we removed was wicking oil along the block edge. We will coat the bearing cap groove and the circular side on the pan.

    Comment


    • Mitch
      Mitch commented
      Editing a comment
      I always just use a spray tack to hold it in place if I'm doing this in the car. No other sealer other than the spots u mentioned. Make sure there is no oil anywhere"s on the mounting surfaces. This is how i do it but other opinions may vary
      Some of the front oil pan bolts go into the oil, (they are not a blind hole) so put a little something on those threads. And again i stress make sure you have no oil residue at all..
      When tightening up the pan stop when you see the gasket start to move the slightest bit.

  • #5
    Originally posted by plyfor View Post
    Should we coat the cork gasket with copper coat or something similar? The article says not to but the old cork type we removed was wicking oil along the block edge. We will coat the bearing cap groove and the circular side on the pan.
    I have always used Form-a-gasket to attach any gasket to the "removed" part for ease of cleaning IF removal is needed. Now, as for using a sealer on the other side, I have used assembly grease which will squeeze out and leave both surfaces stuck together enough to hold a seal, and yet allow the gasket to be removed should the need arise. This has worked very well for me for eons.
    You wana look waaay far up da road and plan yer route because the brakes are far more of a suggestion than a command!

    Comment


    • #6
      When I got my engine from the engine builder he used the black permatex with no gasket. So far (3,000 miles) so good.
      Alaskan A's
      Antique Auto Mushers of Alaska
      Model A Ford Club of America
      Model A Restorers Club
      Antique Automobile Club of America
      Mullins Owners Club

      Comment


      • #7
        I also like the cork pan gasket, and I like to use a stick-um to hold it to the engine block, then a light coat of grease on the pan lip. This way the gasket stays in place and the pan should easily come off to check bearings. These pictures are from a customer's house and he had white lithium grease on hand. I usually like to use Mystik JT-6 red high temp grease for assembly, but this engine was started within a few days, so the white lithium didn't get a chance to separate or dry out.

        I cut a U shape in the front of the side gaskets to fit around the rope seal. Most times I have to trim a little of the rope, but leave enough to compress when the pan is bolted on. I also never soak rope seals, but tuck them into the groove, then form them with a socket, then oil and grease them. Notice I seal the rear main cap and bolts also.
        You do not have permission to view this gallery.
        This gallery has 3 photos.

        Comment


      • #8
        we did the same as in photo 2 with ultra copper but didn't coat the bearing cap gasket -to- pan with Perm Aviation or similar. Our gasket in photo 1 didn't reach the pulley and was notched around the rope seal so both ropes touched. Probably better for the pan gasket to bridge the ropes.Photos very helpful, thanks.
        BTW, we're not sure if it's possible to reuse the thicker rubberized gasket as long as it didn't move. It is stuck to the block in a few places.
        Last edited by plyfor; 08-11-2017, 10:56 PM.

        Comment


        • #9
          The Dog: advises me to STAY OUT of THIS THREAD!!!!
          Bill Quiet

          Comment


          • BNCHIEF
            BNCHIEF commented
            Editing a comment
            That's a smart dog.

        • #10
          I've reused gaskets as long as they aren't damaged, or too flat. I apply a bit of sealer to them and installed the part before the sealer dries, if it's that type of sealer.

          Comment


          • #11
            I'm tryin' HARD, to stay out of this.
            Bill Quiet

            Comment


            • #12
              Update ; removed the no seal gaskets and installed the thinner cork / comp type with no added sealer except at the rear bearing cap and gasket intersections as shown. The clutch housing cover was also lightly sealed to the bearing cap cork The gaskets fit well and touched the front pulley sandwiched between the ropes. After some heatup / run in, the pan bolts needed to be retorque'd slightly to 5'#.

              Comment


              • Mitch
                Mitch commented
                Editing a comment
                Nice

            • #13
              Originally posted by DaWizard View Post
              This is what I use as a reference and has done very well for me in the past.
              http://www.sacramentocapitolas.org/s...et-Article.pdf
              The second page of the article, paragraph (H), indicates "a small amount of contact cement is applied to the block surface to hold the gasket in place" while installing oil pan. Doesn't contact cement require cement on both mating surfaces? With contact cement you get one shot at alignment and it's permanent. If I use the fel-pro snap-ups seems like I wouldn't need contact cement.

              https://youtu.be/VKOWLO7f2Jk

              Comment


              • #14
                When I install the pan on while in the car, I attach the gasket to the pan and make sure it has time to set. You can use some sort of tacky cement, just be sure it will give you a decent seal.
                You wana look waaay far up da road and plan yer route because the brakes are far more of a suggestion than a command!

                Comment


                • #15
                  Lots of ways to do this. I use a skim coat of Permatex Anaerobic on the cork gasket on the pan side, wipe off all but a skim coat so it does not get in your oil, place/position it on the pan. Stays flexible and does not cure until it is squeezed/lack of air when the pan bolts are tightened.
                  https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0002UEONM...3920250_dpLink

                  Lots of different ways that work..
                  Last edited by 1930 Closed Cab PU; 05-21-2021, 01:16 PM. Reason: sp

                  Comment


                  • #16
                    Originally posted by CarlG View Post
                    When I got my engine from the engine builder he used the black permatex with no gasket. So far (3,000 miles) so good.
                    When I recently replaced my timing gear, naturally I had to remove the timing cover. The cork gasket in that area disintegrated when I removed the cover. I cleaned the mating surfaces meticulously and replaced that portion of the gasket with Permatex Ultra Black. I used a generous blob size, and I made my line close to the outer edge of the mating surface in order to reduce the risk that excess silicone would end up in the oil pan.

                    If I drop the pan again, I'll replace the silicone with a proper cork gasket, but for now it seems to be holding up OK, no leaks around the timing cover.

                    Comment


                    • #17
                      Permatex right stuff or ultra black, are both very similar products. You can do a full pan using it, and it won’t leak. If you have to remove this said pan, you’ll bend it up just breaking the seal. We use right stuff at the corners, a thin film on the rear lip cork and in place of the rear cam gasket.
                      4~ Tudor's
                      1~ Coupe

                      Henry Ford said,
                      "It's all nuts and bolts"


                      Mitch's Auto Service ctr

                      Comment


                      • #18
                        Originally posted by Tom Wesenberg View Post
                        I also like the cork pan gasket, and I like to use a stick-um to hold it to the engine block, then a light coat of grease on the pan lip. This way the gasket stays in place and the pan should easily come off to check bearings. These pictures are from a customer's house and he had white lithium grease on hand. I usually like to use Mystik JT-6 red high temp grease for assembly, but this engine was started within a few days, so the white lithium didn't get a chance to separate or dry out.

                        I cut a U shape in the front of the side gaskets to fit around the rope seal. Most times I have to trim a little of the rope, but leave enough to compress when the pan is bolted on. I also never soak rope seals, but tuck them into the groove, then form them with a socket, then oil and grease them. Notice I seal the rear main cap and bolts also.
                        Is that Blue Hylomar?

                        Comment


                        • #19
                          Originally posted by dmaxweb View Post

                          Is that Blue Hylomar?
                          That was done at a customer's house using what he had, as I recall it was the blue silicone, and most likely Permatex brand.

                          Comment


                          • #20
                            Originally posted by dmaxweb View Post

                            The second page of the article, paragraph (H), indicates "a small amount of contact cement is applied to the block surface to hold the gasket in place" while installing oil pan. Doesn't contact cement require cement on both mating surfaces? With contact cement you get one shot at alignment and it's permanent. If I use the fel-pro snap-ups seems like I wouldn't need contact cement.

                            https://youtu.be/VKOWLO7f2Jk
                            In post 4.1 above a "spray tack" was suggested to hold the cork gasket in place if installing the pan with the engine in the car. What type/brand of spray tack should be used? Do I spray it on the block mating surface?

                            Comment


                            • #21
                              Originally posted by dmaxweb View Post

                              In post 4.1 above a "spray tack" was suggested to hold the cork gasket in place if installing the pan with the engine in the car. What type/brand of spray tack should be used? Do I spray it on the block mating surface?
                              We use a weather strip adhesive, similar to 3M. Spray the block side of the gasket, wait a minute for it to get tacky then stick it on.
                              4~ Tudor's
                              1~ Coupe

                              Henry Ford said,
                              "It's all nuts and bolts"


                              Mitch's Auto Service ctr

                              Comment


                              • #22

                                Will one of these work?

                                https://www.permatex.com/products/ga.../?locale=en_us

                                https://www.permatex.com/products/ga.../?locale=en_us
                                Last edited by dmaxweb; 05-28-2021, 07:08 AM.

                                Comment


                                • #23
                                  https://www.permatex.com/products/ga.../?locale=en_us

                                  The high tack should be okay.

                                  The 3M mentioned is this

                                  https://www.amazon.com/Super-77-Glue...2200632&sr=8-1

                                  4~ Tudor's
                                  1~ Coupe

                                  Henry Ford said,
                                  "It's all nuts and bolts"


                                  Mitch's Auto Service ctr

                                  Comment

                                  widgetinstance 451 (<center>Related Topics</center>) skipped due to lack of content & hide_module_if_empty option.
                                  Working...
                                  X