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  • Ford Model A assembly line

    Nothing new, most of you have seen this before, but it is still fun to watch! Ford was good about documenting and filming their operations we're glad today that they did.

    That guy on the main line connecting the engine to the drivetrain must have been the Main Man he appears in still photos a lot too.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zw4UcBtEbjo
    Last edited by Jeff/Illinois; 08-09-2018, 02:21 PM.

  • #2
    Jeff
    I have seen that one in the past. It is a good flick and it was not in the Articles video thread.
    So thanks I just added it
    https://www.vintagefordforum.com/art...factory-videos
    4~ Tudor's
    1~ Coupe

    Henry Ford said,
    "It's all nuts and bolts"


    Mitch's Auto Service ctr

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Jeff/Illinois View Post
      Nothing new, most of you have seen this before, but it is still fun to watch! Ford was good about documenting and filming their operations we're glad today that they did.

      That guy on the main line connecting the engine to the drivetrain must have been the Main Man he appears in still photos a lot too.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zw4UcBtEbjo
      Ford also went into towns all across America, and documented Many activities, and histories, and carefully inserted his advertising into these, which, I believe, further reinforces the fact that he was indeed a genius, and way ahead of the times!

      Comment


      • #4
        Ford could use that same management today, before CEO Hackett completely breaks them. The guy is an idiot.

        They need to fire him, and get some Toyota management in there before it's too late.

        Comment


        • #5
          I don't suppose this would have been playing over the factory's P.A. system?
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pyBZnLuNJ7k

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          • #6
            The most AMAZING thing I remember from assembley line videos was POURING Model A Blocks, while they were MOVING, on the assembly line!!!
            KDad KHot

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            • #7
              It always amazed me that he got it on the road in 6-8 months. It takes at least 3-5 years today and that's using the same engines and transmissions. The model was entirely new! I gather that H.F. had no plans of replacing the "T", that he had to be convinced. Henry's stubbornness almost sank the company. Once he got on board with the changes, he wanted to do some pretty funny things like an upgraded planetary transmission. I guess at that point, Edsel took over. Anyway, I think of just the fender die development. Figure out a blank on paper. cut it out in steel, Put it through the dies (How many dies, how many strikes?) see how it it does, see how it needs to be over bent, how much spring back? What kind of lubricant. Cut a blank and make a one inch grid pattern on it and see where it pulls and tears. Then make a master from which you make all your working dies. Like making a recording, first a "Mother" to make a master, from which you do your production. Only these don't weigh 5 or 10 lbs. They weigh five tons and they pulled it off in six months.
              Terry

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              • #8
                Ford was in design mode much sooner than advertised. Didn't want to kill the Model T sales. this is a drawing of the dash from 2/27, six months before the T production stopped. Also remember the T repair part production continued.


                27Dash.jpg
                Sorry, the thumbnail us all a have handy.
                http://jmodela.coffeecup.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  Ford was influenced by the popular management tool of Time and Motion study in the design of the assembly line. He worked with Frederick Taylor on this (also the Gilbreths of Cheaper by the Dozen fame were influential Time and Motion experts at that time). Time and Motion studied the fundamental elements or motions required to perform a task. Then the workers were trained to perform those optimized elements and motions to achieve the maximum efficiency for a given task. An example would be that the worker should tighten the wheel lugs starting with the top one and turn the lug wrench clockwise x number of times until the lug was tight. Another example is touch typing on a QWERTY keyboard (I believe the Gilbreths developed that method).

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                  • #10
                    Tashi Ohno and Toyoda (with a d) took Ford's work, along with Taylor, Galberth, added Deming's statistical analysis and process control (pdca, six sigma) and developed and are still developing Toyota Production System (also called Lean, lean six sigma, etc.).

                    The US has a need to use Lean to improve but I think it has been misinterpreted. We look to the tools used in lean, apply them once get improvement and stop. Production changes, isn't looked at again, problems develop and we say that lean doesn't work. Or lean won't work in the US.
                    The USA wants the processes to be faster. Lean also looks at the spaces between the processes. Lean is the reduction of, or elimination of, waste. Not necessarily making things faster.

                    Example.
                    The pharmacy I worked at processed 3000 faxed prescriptions a day. There were roughly 7 processes where actual value added work occurred. It took roughly 36 hours to get a rx from door to door. A "walk in" rx was processed in twenty minutes. Looking at the faxed rx, each process total value added work was about 20 minutes, same as the walk in.

                    0.3 hrs/rx x 3000 rxs x $10/hr = $9,000 value added work per 36hours.

                    35.7 hrs/rx x 3000 rxs x $10/hr) = $1,071,000 non value added work (waste) per 36hours

                    What I tried to point out was, if we made each value added process infinitely fast (zero time) there would still be 35hrs 40 minutes of waste. The savings would be $9,000/day if we zeroed in time of value added work.

                    If we eliminated even10% of the waste:
                    35hrs/rx x 3000rx/day x $10/hr x 10% improvement = $105,000 savings per 36hours.

                    Those savings would allow the 7 processes to be slowed. Fewer mistakes, less rework( more savings), happy employees(less turn over, less training).

                    Management did time motion studies on a couple of the processes, tweaked the computer and reduced 3 processes by 20%. Increased the stress on the employee to produce faster, increased errors then claimed lean didn't work.

                    sorry about this post, as you an tell the president of my club is opinionated.
                    Last edited by Jim Mason; 08-11-2018, 08:42 AM.
                    http://jmodela.coffeecup.com

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                    • #11
                      Jim, As a former Tool and Die maker, I would hate to know that people were parsing up my time and my life like that. As an aside, My Mother in law knew some of the Galbraith children from when she went to the Nishuane elem. school in Montclair, NJ, As a further aside, My father in law, had Col. Lewis for a Scout leader. He kept telling me this and I fluffed it off until he said Col. Lewis, who invented that gun. The Lewis Gun! Of course ! It all came together for me at that time. Montclair, Nj was a gathering place for some of the great fortunes and names. I wish he was still here and I could ask him if he knew A.K. Miller.
                      Terry

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Terry, NJ View Post
                        Jim, As a former Tool and Die maker, I would hate to know that people were parsing up my time and my life like that. Terry
                        That's another misunderstanding regarding lean. You'd be looking at your own time, the waste just before, and just after.

                        one of the wastes that lean gets rid of is waste of knowledge of the workers. think back on your career. I bet you'll find you had ideas that would have made your job easier, fewer little annoyances and less wasteful of time, motion, or any other of the lean defined wastes. Yet nobody would even try it. Lean uses scientific method. state a problem, gather data, refine the problem, make a hypothesis to test, define a number of solutions, test each on a small scale, measure the results, determine best solution. Apply on larger scale, retest, deploy solution, determine controls to be sure solution stays in place and improvement us held. repeat with next or new problem that is exposed. all of this is done by the people doing the process not by management telling them what to do. remember look at the spaces between the processes first. The people doing the process are probably working at capacity. don't come up with ideas for the other guy to do differently. Work with the process before and after and the space between.

                        Here's the wastes defined by lean, see if they sound familiar.

                        the-8-wastes-def2.png
                        Last edited by Jim Mason; 08-11-2018, 01:30 PM.
                        http://jmodela.coffeecup.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Jim, Surprise, surprise! I was fortunate enough to spend my last years in the trade as a model maker, My exact title was Senior Mechanical Model Maker. We were almost respectable! LOL! No longer a "UN" Boy ( UNder Appreciated, UNder Paid, and UNder Observation) The Technicians and the Engineers, and the Scientists that we talked to, actually cared about what we said and thought. This is a rarity! It was at RCA, the old Sarnoff Labs in Princeton, NJ! Many of the guys in the shop had patents to their name. I had one written up and the process was begun but I don't know what became of it. I was new and didn't want to push it. Problem! We had to plate a thousand or more .010 X .010 X .100 diamond stylii to plate with gold on two sides and Titanium on two sides. These were the Stylii for the new Video Disc. It was complicated and I gave them a way to do it. I won't bore you with how I did it, but it came to me in a flash. But I don't know of a single company that treated it's people so well!
                          Terry




                          Originally posted by Jim Mason View Post

                          That's another misunderstanding regarding lean. You'd be looking at your own time, the waste just before, and just after.

                          one of the wastes that lean gets rid of is waste of knowledge of the workers. think back on your career. I bet you'll find you had ideas that would have made your job easier, fewer little annoyances and less wasteful of time, motion, or any other of the lean defined wastes. Yet nobody would even try it. Lean uses scientific method. state a problem, gather data, refine the problem, make a hypothesis to test, define a number of solutions, test each on a small scale, measure the results, determine best solution. Apply on larger scale, retest, deploy solution, determine controls to be sure solution stays in place and improvement us held. repeat with next or new problem that is exposed. all of this is done by the people doing the process not by management telling them what to do. remember look at the spaces between the processes first. The people doing the process are probably working at capacity. don't come up with ideas for the other guy to do differently. Work with the process before and after and the space between.

                          Here's the wastes defined by lean, see if they sound familiar.

                          the-8-wastes-def2.png

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I worked at Deere for many years. I can't tell you the number of times their 'engineers' would come out and ask US guys, actually doing the work, 'how' to do it faster and better. Huh?? You're the bloody 'educated engineer' you figure it out. And if we told you, you would run back to your boss and tell him ' look what I came up with' trying to make yourself look good.

                            Some of the dumbest people I ever met in manufacturing were 'engineers'. The people on the shop floor knew ten times what these clowns knew. And we never ever shared with them!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I wasn't there during his life, but many of the guys in the shop had known Gen. David Sarnoff when he was alive. He was a remarkable man! I believe it was he who instituted the policies of recognition of achievement and inspiration. Most shops handled it as a windfall and just disregarded you if you weren't in the Clique of the "Anointed Ones". Claiming some worker's ideas as your own is par for the course with most of them. Sarnoff and RCA wanted to wring out every last good idea they could and they figured that they could do that much better by giving credit for those ideas than lying about it. It was a great company to work for.
                              Terry



                              Originally posted by Jeff/Illinois View Post
                              I worked at Deere for many years. I can't tell you the number of times their 'engineers' would come out and ask US guys, actually doing the work, 'how' to do it faster and better. Huh?? You're the bloody 'educated engineer' you figure it out. And if we told you, you would run back to your boss and tell him ' look what I came up with' trying to make yourself look good.

                              Some of the dumbest people I ever met in manufacturing were 'engineers'. The people on the shop floor knew ten times what these clowns knew. And we never ever shared with them!

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Some photos. I have a lot more.
                                You do not have permission to view this gallery.
                                This gallery has 15 photos.
                                Bill
                                http://www.brauchauto.com/
                                Eastern Connecticut

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