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February 20, 1954 - The Prototype of the 1955 Thunderbird is Revealed for the First Time at the Detroit Auto Show

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  • February 20, 1954 - The Prototype of the 1955 Thunderbird is Revealed for the First Time at the Detroit Auto Show

    Prototype-1955 Thunderbird.jpg Rushed into production to compete with GM's 1954 Corvette.

  • #2
    Were there any changes made from the prototype to the actual production cars?
    3 ~ Tudor's
    Henry Ford said
    "It's all nuts and bolts"


    Mitch's Auto Service ctr

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    • #3
      Yes-it's introduction was just like the VE Model A and the 1964 1/2 Mustang 10 years later. That is, for the most part the changes were engineering changes, not styling changes. The biggest changes came 2 years later in 1957, both stylistically and engineering wise, somewhat as they did with the 1930-31 Model A's. The 1957 actually had a turbo in some models and the electrical system went from the 6 volt systems of the 1955 and 1956 to a 12 volt for 1957. Some of the options for 1957 were seat belts at a cost of about $10 (it was blended in with a "safety package" but I don't know the components of that package) and a portable electric razor that could run off household current or the car's cigarette lighter (I have such a razor).

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      • Mitch
        Mitch commented
        Editing a comment
        I love that body style T-bird Thanks for all the info

      • 40 DeLuxe
        40 DeLuxe commented
        Editing a comment
        A couple of notes: The '57 did not have a turbo in any model. It was a belt driven supercharger. And, the change to 12 volts came in '56, not '57.

    • #4
      pretty sure they went to 12volt for 56 not 57

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      • #5
        Thanks1 You are correct. 1955 Thunderbirds were 6 volt positive ground. 1956 Thunderbirds were 12 volt negative ground with 12 volt guages. 1957 Thunderbirds were 12 volt negative ground with 6 volt gauges and a guage voltage regulator. I read that a guage voltage regulator was a feature of Ford cars in the 1970's but I can't verify (never owned a '70's Ford).

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