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  • Painting tip

    What is pictured are not Model A fenders. No matter, the principle is the same.
    I am referring to painting the inside of deep-drawn fenders such as the A rear fenders.
    Such a task is a challenge.
    Once all the metal work is complete, we can attack the plastic work needed and shoot the insides.

    First, because of the concavity, the paint wants to pepper back at you. You are shooting into a deep hole.
    Second, because of the lips that need painting, this is another challenge, you need to be at a right angle to the lip.

    There would be many ways to solve these problems. This is what we do here (fenders are from a '47 Stude M5 pickup, fronts and rears are the same)
    We break the shoot up into 2 parts.
    Part 1 we shoot the mounting lip and a reasonable amount of the main part of the fender, about half-way up.
    Part 2 next day we flip the fender and shoot the other half.

    All the major paint manufacturers carry blending agents for use for blending panels for collision repair. PPG calls their product Blend-Ease.
    Blend Ease will bite into previously cured paint for a good bond and blend.
    Now, for collision work, you would scuff the entire panel, then limit your shoot to the repaired area for the first 2 coats. On the 3rd coat, you add BlendEase at a rate of 50%, and shoot the entire panel.

    We slightly modify this mix as follows:
    The second day we add about 5% BlendEase to the mix in the gun, and then shoot as many coats as we want. For the insides of fenders, we use 2 coats, since we will not be buffing the paint. We do not scuff what we did in Part 1.

    On exterior work, you would shoot 3 coats since you will be wet sanding off most of the last coat. Recall one coat of paint is about 1 mil.

    Also, we will shoot down to about 50° temp, because we use accelerator. O/W 50° is too cold for the urethane to cure. The air temp for these fenders both days was 50°.

    BTW that dull battleship gray color of the metal is because we spray down all blasted steel with phosphoric acid, which is a passivating agent for steel and cast. Once done, it can be stored indoors for literally years and not rust. I have a spare Model A frame stashed in the shop that was blasted and passivated 30 yrs ago and there is not a speck of rust. The color you are looking at is iron phosphate, and can be directly painted over. This way, we can metal work the fenders in small bites and not be rushed to spray on epoxy or something that would just get in the way of metal repair

    Should you decide to use phosphoric acid for this purpose, some of the bottles say to wash it off after with water. Do NOT do this, you have just washed away the acid and its resulting protection

    BlendEase.jpg


    fenders2.jpg

    fenders3.jpg
    Last edited by tbirdtbird; 01-11-2018, 12:03 AM.

  • #2
    A Model A "Tip" written by a Model A owner seems to always appear to have a very special Common-Sense solution to resolve a very interesting, unique Model A restoration problem.

    No matter the particular subject, just seeing the word "Model A Tip" can draw attention from serious Model A restorers.

    Thanks for taking the time to share unique, detailed educational painting information with photos, not often explained in such detail in painting manuals.

    Comment


    • #3
      Great post, Dave. As a do-it-yourselfer I painted my Tudor in 1980 with the materials and knowledge that was available at the time, and the paint still looks good after 38 years. But today I wouldn't even begin to attempt it. Paint chemistry, equipment, and laws, not to mention material costs, have changed so much I don't know how the average guy could paint his own car anymore.

      Comment


      • tbirdtbird
        tbirdtbird commented
        Editing a comment
        Ray, I kinda know what your saying, but you cut your teeth on a different system, prolly lacquer or enamel.
        It is not as hard as people think, and I don't know how anyone can afford to pay a commercial paint shop!!!!

        There is plenty of painting advice available right here. The super strict laws pertain to a commercial shop, and as long as you are not in California you can do it!!! The urethanes lay down very easily.

        Glad your paint is holding up, that is a testament to the skills you have. Stop by some day, and I'll put an HVLP gun in your hand and fill it with some urethane paint and you'll be off and running like you did it your whole life. If you could paint 38 yrs ago you can paint now. Just like riding a bike
        Last edited by tbirdtbird; 01-11-2018, 03:30 PM.

      • Ray Horton
        Ray Horton commented
        Editing a comment
        Dave, you're right. Lacquer on the body and enamel on the fenders and aprons. No runs, easy rub out, no crackled surfaces later. I think it was just dumb luck, looking back on all the things that could have gone wrong! If you were closer I'd take up your offer to try out some of the new stuff. At my age I think I have finished my last car, though.

    • #4
      Dave this super information, and for a non painter like me i learned some things. Thanks for taking the time to documenting this procedure. One thing i would do different is buff the inside of the fenders


      [video=youtube_share;BoPlsitDZ9Q]https://youtu.be/BoPlsitDZ9Q[/video]
      3 ~ Tudor's
      Henry Ford said
      "It's all nuts and bolts"


      Mitch's Auto Service ctr

      Comment


      • tbirdtbird
        tbirdtbird commented
        Editing a comment
        just shoot 3 coats instead of 2

        Kool vid, a scotch brite pad would have made it easier
        Last edited by tbirdtbird; 01-11-2018, 11:34 PM.

    • #5
      Thanks Tbird, very good tip.

      Comment

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        by tbirdtbird
        Original Thread


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