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Beam vs Click Torque Wrench

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  • Beam vs Click Torque Wrench

    Which type gives you the most reliable reading, especially for head bolt downs?

  • #2
    I have used both and found the beam to be lacking. I currently use a click that has been calibrated at an aircraft facility. Also, did you know you can check the calibration using a vice and a brick? Clamp it up in the vice, preweigh the brick and hang it on the end of the wrench and see what you get.
    You wana look waaay far up da road and plan yer route because the brakes are far more of a suggestion than a command!

    Comment


    • #3
      If properly calibrated they should both be accurate. I find the click type easier to use, since no scale gazing is necessary .
      3 ~ Tudor's
      Henry Ford said
      "It's all nuts and bolts"


      Mitch's Auto Service ctr

      Comment


      • #4
        My wife got me a click one a while back at Harbor freight? Is that junk, is there a more reliable brand.

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        • #5
          Claude, I have found that HF has good and bad tools. You might want to have the calibration checked. Not sure where you are, but I bet there is someplace around you that could do the job.
          You wana look waaay far up da road and plan yer route because the brakes are far more of a suggestion than a command!

          Comment


          • #6
            When I use my click-type torque wrench, I always store it at the lowest level on the scale: supposed to be a way to maintain accurate calibration.

            Comment


            • #7
              There was a thread on a garage forum about the HF clickers. Believe it or not they were found to be pretty accurate. How long they maintain that accuracy is anyone's guess. Personally i only own Snap On torques
              3 ~ Tudor's
              Henry Ford said
              "It's all nuts and bolts"


              Mitch's Auto Service ctr

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by BudP View Post
                When I use my click-type torque wrench, I always store it at the lowest level on the scale: supposed to be a way to maintain accurate calibration.
                Hi Bud
                There are two different variations of those clickers. One has the adjustable handle and the other uses the knob in the front. I am pretty sure it's best to turn the adjustable handle style to 0. The knob deal does not screw up the calibration by leaving it set higher during storage.
                3 ~ Tudor's
                Henry Ford said
                "It's all nuts and bolts"


                Mitch's Auto Service ctr

                Comment


                • BudP
                  BudP commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Did not know. Thanks Mitch!

              • #9
                I have both Snap-On clicks and several beam types. I far prefer the beam. I find them easier to use as I am in control of how much force I apply to the wrench while watching the scale. In torque to yield apps you can see, easily feel and compare the yield points across several fasteners. You can also measure the break loose torque of fasteners, not possible with the click wrenches. I guess I'm old school.

                Comment


                • BNCHIEF
                  BNCHIEF commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Might be but your point is certainly valid.

                • Russ/40
                  Russ/40 commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Amen to that, just dont have any feel with the clickers.

              • #10
                I have an inch lb, 3/8" drive, beam wrench and a 1/2 " drive "click" type. Neither of which has a dial. Why is that important? I am about to rebuild a rear and the preloads on on the bearings is 20 in.Lbs and supposedly I should be measuring the preloads with a dial type wrench, why? What is important that I'm missing?
                Terry

                Comment


                • #11
                  Originally posted by MikeK View Post
                  I have both Snap-On clicks and several beam types. I far prefer the beam. I find them easier to use as I am in control of how much force I apply to the wrench while watching the scale. In torque to yield apps you can see, easily feel and compare the yield points across several fasteners. You can also measure the break loose torque of fasteners, not possible with the click wrenches. I guess I'm old school.
                  Old School HUH.
                  I have this in my Arsenal, does your beam type look like this? Am I Old School too? This is Snap On !!!
                  You do not have permission to view this gallery.
                  This gallery has 4 photos.
                  3 ~ Tudor's
                  Henry Ford said
                  "It's all nuts and bolts"


                  Mitch's Auto Service ctr

                  Comment


                  • #12
                    Mitch, yep, that's definitely an old school pre-click era Snap On torque wrench! My dad had one at his Texaco station. I WISH I had it!

                    Comment


                    • #13
                      I love that vintage torque wrench. I see several oldies similar to this one for sale. They all seem very well made not like the junk you buy today. If I were to buy an antique torque wrench, do they remain true or do springs rust and readings are faulty?

                      Comment


                      • Mitch
                        Mitch commented
                        Editing a comment
                        I bet they would be in need of calibration. Mine are basically a conversation piece

                    • #14
                      Originally posted by Terry, NJ View Post
                      I have an inch lb, 3/8" drive, beam wrench and a 1/2 " drive "click" type. Neither of which has a dial. Why is that important? I am about to rebuild a rear and the preloads on on the bearings is 20 in.Lbs and supposedly I should be measuring the preloads with a dial type wrench, why? What is important that I'm missing?
                      Terry
                      I use this type torque wrench for Banjo rear ends. Title says ft lb but it is inch.

                      https://www.amazon.com/Presa-CP31006...SIN=B00XKIIKOM

                      John
                      Last edited by john in illinois; 01-30-2018, 01:25 PM.

                      Comment

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